If you didn’t happen to pick up a paper copy of The New York Times Thursday, you missed out on something special: not only are there 27 different collector’s edition covers, but inside are portraits of 130 women in Congress — “a testament to what power looks like in Congress.”

That’s great and The New York Times is free to do whatever it wants to do. There are plenty of strong conservative women in Congress and we wish there were more.

But we can’t help but notice as those special covers flash by that there’s a lot of news about these women that isn’t being covered so well by the paper honoring them for their gender.

Right up front is Sheila Jackson Lee, who’s been accused of retaliating against a young staffer who was was planning to pursue legal action over an alleged rape by a former employee of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, the board of which Jackson Lee chairs. And don’t forget that it was an intern in Jackson Lee’s office who doxxed three GOP Senators as they questioned Dr. Christine Blasey Ford during the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation hearings.

And there’s there’s Ilhan Omar, who tweeted without evidence that Sen. Lindsey Graham is “compromised” and is being blackmailed to support President Trump. And Frederica Wilson, the “rock star” who spread rumors of what she claimed she overheard President Trump say in a phone call to the wife of a fallen Green Beret.

And there’s Rashida Tlaib, who invited to a private dinner and posed with a man who has compared Israel to ISIS. And there’s Kirsten Gillibrand, who brought the “Mattress Girl” rape hoaxer to a State of the Union address as her guest and campaigned with Bill Clinton while praising the #MeToo movement.

That’s not all that came to mind watching that little slideshow, but now that The New York Times has celebrated the women of the 116th Congress, maybe it will do some actual reporting on them?

Remember swearing-in day, when reporters swooned over all of the colors on the women in Congress while all the GOP men were in black or navy suits?

So, is it going to be all softballs throughout their terms, or is there going to be some gender-free reporting?


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