We’re still struggling to process the fact that Georgia GOP Gov. Brian Kemp would just shamelessly sign a voter suppression bill into law. Probably because it wasn’t actually a voter suppression bill (despite the prevailing media narrative).

But can we at least all come together and be outraged that water is now prohibited at Georgia polls?

Washington Post Fact Checker Glenn Kessler can’t believe it either. Probably because it’s not true.

But you’d never know that if you took Glenn Kessler’s word at face value:

Like Georgia?

Apparently Glenn did read it. Which makes his “fact check” even weirder:

Long lines have often been experienced during Georgia’s elections, especially in majority-Black districts. Food and water would be distributed while people stood in line. The new Georgia law makes that illegal if such assistance occurs within 150 feet of the building where voting is taking place.

Here’s the language:

“No person shall solicit votes in any manner or by any means or method, nor shall any person distribute or display any campaign material, nor shall any person give, offer to give, or participate in the giving of any money or gifts, including, but not limited to, food and drink, to an elector, nor shall any person solicit signatures for any petition, nor shall any person, other than election officials discharging their duties, establish or set up any tables or booths on any day in which ballots are being cast: (1) Within 150 feet of the outer edge of any building within which a polling place is established; (2) Within any polling place; or within 25 feet of any voter standing in line to vote at any polling place.”

The law added, however, that poll workers were not prohibited from “making available self-service water from an unattended receptacle to an elector waiting in line to vote.”

So, basically, food or water is not prohibited at Georgia polls, is what Glenn is saying here. Despite having said that food or water is specifically prohibited at Georgia polls.

Glenn keeps using this word “fact.” We do not think it means what he thinks it means.

Well, yes. Because they are.

Because he’s the Washington Post’s Fact Checker. Spreading disinformation is basically his job description.

When’s Twitter going to crack down on guys like Glenn Kessler?