Apparently the New York Times has gotten their hands on volume one of Barack Obama’s new memoir, and you’ll be pleased to know that they overwhelmingly love it:

We, too, are frequently overwhelmed by the overwhelming decency of Barack Obama.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie writes:

Obama’s thoughtfulness is obvious to anyone who has observed his political career, but in this book he lays himself open to self-questioning. And what savage self-questioning. He considers whether his first wanting to run for office was not so much about serving as about his ego or his self-indulgence or his envy of those more successful. He writes that his motives for giving up community organizing and going to Harvard Law are “open to interpretation,” as though his ambition were inherently suspect. He wonders if he perhaps has a fundamental laziness. He acknowledges his shortcomings as a husband, he mourns his mistakes and broods still on his choice of words during the first Democratic primaries. It is fair to say this: not for Barack Obama the unexamined life. But how much of this is a defensive crouch, a bid to put himself down before others can? Even this he contemplates when he writes about having “a deep self-consciousness. A sensitivity to rejection or looking stupid.”

His reluctance to glory in any of his achievements has a particular texture, the modesty of the Brilliant American Liberal, which is not so much false as it is familiar, like a much-practiced pose. It brings an urge to say, in response, “Look, take some credit already!”

Thank goodness that the New York Times is around to bring glory to Barack Obama’s achievements because Lord knows Barack Obama won’t. Read the whole thing so you know just how amazing our humble former president really is.

Fake but accurate.