On Tuesday, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis appointed Dr. Joseph A. Ladapo as the state’s Surgeon General and Secretary of the Department of Health:

Dr. Ladapo said during the announcement that under his leadership, “Florida will completely reject fear as a way of making policies in public health”:

Dr. Ladapo brings a “very serious medical background” to the position, including three degrees from Harvard and previously as an associate professor at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine:

But he’s already being trashed by the media, including this trash tweet from The Guardian that labeled him “anti-vax”:

He opposes a vaccine mandate, which is not at all “anti-vax.” The Guardian appears to acknowledge that pesky fact in the article itself:

A medical professor who is opposed to mask and vaccine mandates, attacked concern over the pandemic as “Covid mania” and likened the eating of fruit and vegetables to the benefits of vaccination has been named as Florida’s new surgeon general.

Not to be outdone by The Guardian, possible DeSantis challenger Charlie Crist added that Dr. Ladapo is a “vaccine skeptic”:

Again, not true. Here’s what he wrote just a few days ago in the WSJ:

This alleged “anti-vax” or “vaccine skeptic” wrote that the “good news is that vaccines continue to afford significant protection against serious illness from Covid-19”:

The good news is that the vaccines continue to afford significant protection against serious illness from Covid-19. The response from many vaccine advocates has been to promote boosters, and the momentum behind third shots is outpacing the limited data available. The reality is that a more practical approach to managing Covid requires a diverse set of strategies, including using outpatient therapies.

And he pointed out that it’s not clear how these mandates are going to work going forward especially with the need for possible booster shots:

Vaccine mandates can’t end the spread of the virus as effectiveness declines and new variants emerge. So how can they be a sensible policy? Is it sensible to consign tens of millions of people to an indeterminate number of boosters and the threat of job loss if it isn’t clear more doses will stop the spread, either?

He concluded, “the sensible approach, based on the available data, is to promote vaccines for the purpose of preventing serious illness. You don’t need a mandate for this”:

The sensible approach, based on the available data, is to promote vaccines for the purpose of preventing serious illness. You don’t need a mandate for this—adults can make their own decisions. But mandates will prolong political conflicts over Covid-19, and they are an increasingly unsustainable strategy designed to achieve an unattainable goal.

As for the “anti-mask” comments, following the science is now “anti-mask”?”

He’s also written previously on the need to recognize that we’ll be living with Covid for quite some time now, a position that’s pretty much universally accepted at this point:

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Tags: DeSantis