Fortunately, this news comes to us from the U.K., where, unfortunately, freedom of speech doesn’t have the constitutional protection it has here and PC culture has gone wild in London under Mayor Sadiq Khan.

Imagine: The White House Correspondents Association would have to warn its members not to refer to their annual dinner as “nerd prom,” and Best Buy would have to rebrand its army of “Geek Squad” members.

Not only does Dr. Sonja Flack, a psychology lecturer at the University of East London, think that calling someone a nerd or a geek should be considered a hate crime; she insists there be legal consequences for anyone using the terms as a form of ridicule.

Fortunately, “Good Morning Britain,” the show that nearly got Piers Morgan investigated by the U.K. Office of Communications when he said he identified as a penguin, had on as a counterpoint mathematician and teacher and “proud geek” Bobby Seagull, who reminded the audience that many view the “geek” label as a badge of honor.

Falck doubled-down, though. The New York Post writes:

Still, Falck emphasized that “neurodiversity” — or the differences in people’s brains — “is an aspect of individual difference, which really ought to be recognized by society.”

“If you look at those legislations that relate to hate crimes, hate crime is simply about somebody being targeted in a negative way for who they are,” she said. “And a person with a very high IQ who comes across in a different way often is targeted in that way. So I just think [it’s] an individual difference that should be respected.”

The U.K. is already terribly confused about what a “hate crime” is, and as Seagull pointed out, legislation would just trivialize real hate crimes. In Nottinghamshire, for example, police are directed to treat “wolf-whistling” in the street as a misogynist hate crime.

This is so stupid.

Yes, universities are actually suggesting audiences use “jazz hands” rather than applaud and trigger those sensitive to loud sounds.

And for many nerds out there, “geek” is considered praise and validation.

We don’t know what’s going on across the pond, but they can keep it there.

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