We’re old enough to have attended school back before terms like “intersectionality” and “marginalization” had taken over the curriculum, so we didn’t see the carefully placed dog-whistle in The Hill’s tweet about Rep. Ilhan Omar reciting a Muslim verse in the aftermath of the Christchurch mass shooting. Maybe you’ll catch it.

Here’s the tweet on which The Hill was reporting:

Now she’s accusing The Hill of “otherizing” her and other Muslims by pointing out she shared a Muslim verse.

First, our guess is that a Muslim verse is a verse said by Muslims, and second, where the hell did she get the idea that The Hill was suggesting that Muslims aren’t allowed to say a prayer for their dead?

See if you can find the bit in the reporting that suggests Muslims aren’t allowed to say a prayer for their dead:

Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) on Friday expressed support for victims of a mass shooting in New Zealand, tweeting that the devastating attack that killed an estimated 49 people in Christchurch would not force Muslims to “live in fear.”

Omar, who along with Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) is one of the first two Muslim women elected to the House, tweeted that she would attend traditional Friday prayers and urged others to do so as well.

“Inna lilahi wa inna ilayhi raji’un. This is chilling news to wake up to. In the face of this horror, I’m mourning with, and holding our community extra close today,” Omar wrote.

“We must not live in fear. I will be at Jumu’ah today and I hope others will too. Jummah Mubarak,” she added.

Muslim congresswoman says Muslim verse in the aftermath of a mass shooting that killed 49 Muslims. It makes sense to us.

But they “otherized” her as a Muslim whereas a Christian would have just said a prayer. Why she’s making an issue of this when 49 people are dead escapes us, but that’s just how she rolls.


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