2013-05-28T195612Z_1_CBRE94R1JDV00_RTROPTP_3_USA

Actor and unabashed libertarian Rob Lowe called out Bernie Sanders earlier this week after the presidential candidate discussed his plans to raise taxes during a Democrat town hall.

Sanders argued that his tax plan would lower out of pocket expenses for health care by raising the top tax rate to 52% and increasing taxes for anyone making over $230,000.

Rob Lowe wasn’t convinced.

After calling out Bernie Sanders for his flawed rhetoric, Rob Lowe offered the Democratic presidential candidate some advice from his classic West Wing character, Sam Seaborn:

We couldn’t agree more.

  • interestedobserver2

    I only worried about what happened after we came over here for the most part. I do know my Dutch ancestors got run out of Holland by the Spanish back in the day — and apparently that was because they’d led some of the resistance to Spanish occupation — which presumably made them at least “knights” in rank. And on the Swiss side, one of my ancestors was Napoleon’s doctor until about 1808, when HE came over too. On my Mom’s side of the family, her ancestors came over because all of Queen Anne’s ladies in waiting were apparently deported to the colonies after she died (apparently that whole situation, culminating with a certain pirate who named his ship the “Queen Anne’s Revenge,” was fairly serious back then). We DO have proof of that one. But things get mixed up going that far back when you start commuting between continents by sailing ship, so there’s not much proof about anything prior to arriving in America either way…

    • Ryan Schneider.

      Don’t hold that Dutch exil thing too strongly against Don Juan of Austria; his half brother wasted him on that stupid project (which got him killed), when he should have been furthering his plan to rescue Mary Stuart, who he had hoped to marry, but most importantly, he was the only man who had a chance in hell of liberating Constantinople. He had already routed Suliman’s Janasery butchers who would have invaded Europe via Italy, taking advantage of the Reformation divisions to conquer all.

      • interestedobserver2

        I don’t — it was probably the best thing that ever happened to my family, considering how things have worked out over the past five hundred years or so…

        • Ryan Schneider.
          • interestedobserver2

            *Ahem* (I’m a historian by education…) 😉

          • Ryan Schneider.

            Well, it’s good poetry, in any event, and you can never get enough Chesterton✝?

          • interestedobserver2

            There is that. Though it seems a little over-romanticized… 😉

          • Ryan Schneider.

            Not enough genuine romance these days, if you ask me. Lepanto was where the seed of Don Quixote began.

          • interestedobserver2

            Different times, different standards, I guess. We’re all too busy shacking up nowadays to have any time for that “romance stuff.” (Heck, even women are reading trash like “Fifty Shades of Grey” these days…)

          • Ryan Schneider.

            “To dream the impossible dream…”?

          • interestedobserver2

            Yep. Sadly, that seems to be true.

          • Ryan Schneider.

            Furthermore, Lepanto, as well as The Battle of Viena 112 years later, were pivotal triumphs against the tyranny of Political Shariah Law. Unlike the rest of Europe, Poland has never forgotten the Legend of King Sobieski, who is still celebrated every year, even as some whine that honoring him is “islamophobic”. Gee, let’s see, Poland has the lowest Muslim population in Europe, and has the highest native birth rate. Phobic, no, but wise of Wahibism, most certainly!

          • interestedobserver2

            It’s an interesting study to examine the arc from the fall
            of Constantinople through the victory at the second siege of Vienna. Arguably, Ottoman success drove Columbus across the Atlantic, and the struggle with the Ottomans helped establish the Spanish as the preeminent military power in Europe for a hundred years. The victory at Lepanto ultimately ruined Ottoman naval power (though they continued their efforts for another couple of decades with some success), while 2nd Vienna ended their dominance of land warfare and started their long decline. Glancing through the history books, it seems like Ottoman perfidy played a great role in both defeats — killing the commander at Famagusta (by flaying him alive) in violation of their promises to him and his people greatly strengthened the morale of the Christians prior to the battle; they knew how they’d be treated if they lost. Likewise, their destruction of Perchtoldsdorf, again, in violation of their given word, steeled the Austrians to defend Vienna to the death. In the long run, the barbaric behavior of the Muslims seems to always be their
            undoing…

  • Tony Boies

    I’m all for taxing the hell out of Rob Lowe. I am already taxed out, it is his turn.

  • de66ie

    I can find no way to answer that question without getting in trouble, Rogue.

    • Rogue Cheddar

      Depends on what kind of trouble you’re looking to get into. 8:=)