The incredible story of alleged high school whiz kid Mo Islam, reported by “star” financial journalist Jessica Pressler at New York magazine, is all over the news media today:

But when we at Twitchy say incredible, we mean “not credible.” As in this incredible story reeks like a football-sized field of fresh cow manure.

And we’re not the only ones who think so. Here are some of the doubting comments posted in response to the New York article:

This is all BS … Buffet,Soros and Icahn never made those kinds of returns in such a short period,and part time no less. Hell,Even Bernie Madoff didn’t even make such claims

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NONE of this is to be trusted without seeing the brokerage statements.  He’s a minor.  He may trade those accounts, but EVERY transaction has to be the decision of the guardian on the account, his mom or, more likely, his dad. Did the reporter even try to talk to either?

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Not a chance. There was no mention of a single winning stock pick. Nor was there any examination of how a kid under the age of 18 opened a brokerage account and traded like a maniac. Regarding the returns the story implies — keep this in mind. Warren Buffett has averaged a little over 19% a year since 1965. Maybe the kid has some kind of Fantasy Football account. There’s no real money involved. He’s more an aspiring Bernie Madoff than future Warren Buffett.

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Trading stocks during lunch ~ yea ok, i have a bridge i’d like to sell you.

Twitter users have pointed questions, too:

Was the kid’s track record audited? The acclaimed financial journalist and author of the New York article, Jessica Pressler, appears to have … no idea:

Where are all the layers and layers of MSM fact-checkers?

We know, we know. For the privileged left-wing journalistic elite, facts are so passé. What’s really important is that Pressler is considered one of the world’s sexiest financial journalists.

Fun fact: She has just been hired by Bloomberg News.

#Realjournalism: Nice hack work, if you can get it.

Update:

Pressler is backing away from the story’s headline, “Because a Stuyvesant Senior Made $72 Million Trading Stocks on His Lunch Break”:

So, basically, she has no idea if the kid made $72 million trading stocks on his lunch break.

Related:

10 ‘real reporters’ who swallowed story about $72 million stock market whiz kid

Story about kid who earned $72 million trading stocks on his lunch break gets even more ridiculous