Not Even Video Evidence is Enough. Judd Legum's Gotcha Video of Nonbinary Teen...
Sayin' it Without Sayin' it? VP Kamala Harris Carefully Manages Vague Yet Pandering...
Protect and Serve? FBI Agent Charged With Stealing From Homes While Executing Search...
If Trump Wins, Trying to Stop Election Certification Won't Be a 'Threat to...
Pure Nightmare Fuel: Twitter Reacts to Biden Saying the Key to His Marriage...
Could This Get ANY Creepier? No Big Deal, Just Hillary Clinton Openly Talking...
DUH: Yale Brings Back Standardized Testing for Admissions After Realizing It Predicts Acad...
'Absolutely Nuts'! Brendan Carr's Thread on What the FCC Ordered Broadcasters to Do...
'Take the L, Bro': 'Professor' Doubles Down After Community Notes Crushes His Attempt...
HORRIFIC: Libs of TikTok Reports on WI Anti-Catholic Drag Queen Facing Charges of...
OOF! Gallup Poll on Biden Approval Shows NOBODY Is Buying the WH's Attempt...
Lady, Just Take the L! POLITICO Journo Who Trashed Christians and Rights on...
Elon Musk Unimpressed With Google Senior Exec Who Called Him GROVELING About Racist,...
Laurence Tribe TRIPS Gloriously Over Old Tweet After Calling Trump a Tyrant for...
Adopt a Twitchy Editor Today and Stop the Censors From BURYING Conservative Media

California legislators move closer to giving felons the right to vote

President Obama has made criminal justice reform one of his top No. 1 priorities during his final year in office and is actually following through, commuting the sentences of hundreds of supposedly nonviolent felons and urging private businesses to follow the government’s lead in removing questions about prior convictions from job applications.

Advertisement

Gov. Terry McAuliffe of Virginia gave the president a hand in April when he used his executive power to restore voting rights to more than 200,000 convicted felons just in time to vote for Hillary Clinton, and the movement continues across the country.

The legislation still has to make it through the state senate, but on Tuesday, California’s Assembly took its own steps to grant felons voting rights, redefining terms such as “imprisoned” in order to restore voting eligibility for felons in county (but not state or federal) jails, on probation or under community supervision.

The bill passed by a 41-34 vote, presumably without the support of U.S. Navy veteran and Assembly member Melissa Melendez.

Advertisement

But … knowing that they can play a part in the electoral process gives felons a sense of social responsibility, reduces recidivism, slows global climate change and makes rainbows glow just a little brighter. Just last week, Assembly member Shirley Weber celebrated another legislative victory with the passage of her restorative justice bill.

Where existing law treats imprisonment as punishment for a crime committed, Weber’s bill would declare instead that “the purpose of sentencing is public safety achieved through accountability, rehabilitation, and restorative justice.”

 

 

Join the conversation as a VIP Member

Recommended

Trending on Twitchy Videos