In the summer of 2016 there was social upheaval when an all-female cast of “Ghostbusters” was released into theaters. It became a cultural civil war where one side claimed you were supposed to approve of the change, and the other side stated it bastardized the original concept.

In the end the movie was a disappointment in all manner; it was an unfunny comedy, it did nothing to add to the Ghostbusters canon, and it was a financial failure. Hardcore fans were dismayed, but now there is a reason for them to be filled with hope.

This teaser indicates there will be a brand new entry in the “Ghostbusters” universe, and it will be directed by Jason Reitman, who has made “Juno”, and this year’s “Tully”. He also has a bit of a pedigree with the franchise.

This trailer release confirmed what has been a swirling rumor for some months. Dan Aykroyd alluded to this project in an interview from November.

The telling line in that interview was Aykroyd stating, “They are making an effort to bring back all the emotion and spirit of the first two movies.” The studio has described the new film as “The next chapter in the original story.” This means that 2016 misfire will be held up as a standalone release, disconnected from the storyline.

Reitman is the son of director Ivan Reitman, who was behind the first two entries. This is another telling component in just how badly the last effort ended up. Jason, a director with a lengthy resume, has long said he would not make a “Ghostbusters” film. For him to undertake this, and have his father on as a producer of the film, could show things have become desperate at the studio.

There is something poetically funny about this reality.

It seems clear what is at stake here.

The studio behind this is Sony, and it is eager to get reliable properties churning, in an era when most of the majors have a few franchises they can count on for revenue. Sony is leaning on “Jumanji”, and is revisiting its “Men In Black” this summer, so a viable extension of “Ghostbusters” is vital.

That 2016 was not viable. Yet there are a number of entertainment journalists who looked at this new announcement as strictly bad news.

The decision three years ago to make a social statement with an all-female cast to appeal to millinials was not cynical? Scott in his piece can only see the social negatives.

On one hand, you’re rewarding a white male director whose last five movies bombed (and of those, only the two starring Charlize Theron and penned by Diablo Cody received positive reviews) the keys to a hugely valuable franchise mostly because he’s the son of the guy who directed those first two Ghostbusters movies. And yes, unintentional or not, you’re essentially rewarding the specific demographics who reacted in the very worst way to the 2016 Ghostbusters reboot with the thing they claimed to want instead of the… horrors… all-female sci-fi comedy.

Fans saying “We don’t want to see a ‘Woke-busters’ movie” is reacting in the worst way, mind you.

But Scott is not alone in his desire to see more failed attempts at SJW versions of a previously successful movie venture.

Said Graeme McMillan at Heat Vision: “The revival of Ghostbusters in this form feels cynical and insincere in its pursuit of a demographic unsatisfied by the last attempt, which is surely the opposite of everyone involved…It’s something weird and it don’t look good. Who are we supposed to call about this kind of exorcism, though?

While wishing there could be the SJW version of a cinematic property is fine, what these blue-checks fail to acknowlege is the signaling with the 2016 “Ghostbusters” was a pure bust. Fans turned away from it, and Sony suffered for it. The studio fell into the “Get Woke, Go Broke” beartrap, as it lost $70 million on that attempt.

It can be said that revisiting the original storyline, and dispatching that unfunny lecturing remake, is not a result of bowing to the “worst elements” on the internet — it is just sound business.