Sometimes it’s the smaller things we’re proudest of:

Perino was jokingly reminded “you didn’t cook that”:

  • radjahshelduck

    Bad news. Jasper jumped up on the table and ate it…

  • Matt

    Doesn’t take much “skill in the culinary arts” to make a roast, but good for her.

    • Katie Smith

      She said it’s not easy for her to cook, period. Why bother questioning it?? As you can see her dish isn’t just a slab of meat. It DOES take some expertise to make something even as “simple” as a pot roast. I spent years not being able to cook, not enjoying cooking, and getting prissy attitudes from people for it when I tried. It’s really, really not encouraging when a person is struggling to learn something and another person is like “it’s easy, I don’t know why you’re having such a hard time”. Let me give you a clue for free: The proper response is “That looks GREAT! Congratulations, you’re doing a great job. Let me share one of my recipes with you.” See?

      • http://1389blog.com/ 1389AD

        The Internet is a great source for information about food and cooking for the inexperienced cook. I live in an RV and lack space for a library of cook books. But the most important thing is to know what good food is – to have a fairly clear idea of what good food looks like and tastes like.

        • Katie Smith

          Yes, and public libraries! I get everything from the library and then if a certain book is really worth having around I will look for a cheap copy on Ebay. :)

        • Codewizard

          You live in a an RV, and appear to have no job. She has a “job” and lives in Suck City.

          You have more room than 3 Suck City apartments.

          I don’t see any reason to bag on her for this. Her skills at communicating … that’s a different story.

          • http://1389blog.com/ 1389AD

            What on earth are you talking about?

            I most certainly do have a job. And I’m not bagging on anybody.

            What’s Suck City?

            If you can’t comment more cogently than this, I would suggest that you sober up and/or resume taking your prescribed meds before you hit the keyboard.

          • Codewizard

            Oh poor you, comments beyond you; and you can only respond by hurling insults.

            I’m sure that I am not the only one who feels sorry for you.

    • stellatruman

      It does if you are a beginner

    • WhoMeToo

      Anyone can cook. It takes a considerable amount of skill to cook well.

  • ozconservative

    No you didn’t Dana. Someone else made that happen. /sarc

  • therealguyfaux ✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ

    Shoulda had the Italians on your Mom’s side, instead of your father’s– you’d have grown up in the kitchen, Dana. It’s practically a religion.

    • CatHerder ✓fire! ✓fire!

      Meh, Mom was a farm girl from Louisiana and could cook anything. She never had any use for fancy measuring spoons, it was all a pinch, a dab or a right smart. I watched very carefully.

      • mdtljt

        …wow…haven’t heard a right smart since my Aunt Lucille tried to teach me how to make biscuits…never mastered them – my flour hockey pucks are a never ending source of shame for this Southern Girl – but thanks to her my lemon meringue pie & fried chicken ROCK!!! Thanks for reminding me of her…

        • 0bamasnought

          I love biscuits. Can’t make them. Weird thing is; my scones always come out OK. And they are almost the same thing.
          I make better bread though. And I get requests for my corn bread.

          • mdtljt

            I’m on the coast… Hushpuppies are my thing!! Cornbread is a talent… Send me some!!! I kick butt on Calabash style shrimp too…

          • 0bamasnought

            It’s West Coast style.
            Damned near cake.

          • mdtljt

            Yum!!! Although a pone of NC cornbread holds its own better with molasses :-)

          • 0bamasnought

            Oh Man, molasses and whipped butter.

          • mdtljt

            …honeybutter….cinnamon honeybutter… my grandfather kept bees & made his own… YUMMO!!!!

          • deimos19

            the trick to biscuits is not handle the dough. and use this stuff, http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/original-bakewell-cream-8-oz. stir the dough about 6 times and then roll out and cut. follow the recipe on the side of the can and roll out to 1/2 inch. they are the best evah!!

          • 0bamasnought

            They just never taste like Grandma’s.

            But thanks for the hint.

            Over processing is an issue with me.

        • It’s Just Me

          Just don’t overwork it. Dead easy if you’re lazy.

      • 0bamasnought

        Mom was a lousy cook, but she did require me to be self sufficient.
        Thanks Mom.
        My Princess puts limits on what I can cook, She doesn’t like having to buy new pants. I tell her to put down the fork, but she usually grabs a knife.

        • TexasMom2012

          Mom was tired of cooking by the time I was fourteen. So she would let me pick recipes from anywhere, she would go to the store and buy all the ingredients. I would cook and she would clean up my mess. Pretty effective way to let me learn on my own. Although I knew how to cook all kinds of fancy meals, I didn’t learn how to a roast or meatloaf until after I was married!. And since I married a man that is a miracle with the pit… we eat rather well around here! Seldom go out since we usually eat better here. No restaurant can beat hubby with a steak, lobster tails, brisket, chicken, baby back ribs, pork tenderloin, Cajun fried turkey, smoked ham, shrimp brouchette, etc. Pretty good with fish as well. Good thing I just finished my steak or I would be getting hungry!

          • 0bamasnought

            I made lasagna.
            Layered some sliced green tomatoes, and yellow peppers in it. Pork, lamb, and beef that I ran through the grinder, and topped with béchamel.

          • Worship Dancer

            i make a mean lasagna – italian style turkey sausage, 7 cheeses. i triple the ingredients and use one of those large pans normally used in a chafing stand. serves about 30-40 people and LOTS AND LOTS of garlic.

          • Zathras11 @B5

            GARLIC!!! It is good for you. Carry on.

          • http://1389blog.com/ 1389AD

            It sure is!

          • nc ✓s & balances

            Mmmmmm…..

          • http://1389blog.com/ 1389AD

            You have truly been blessed!

      • Matt

        Recipe? They don’t need no stinking recipe.

      • http://twitter.com/thetugboatphil TugboatPhil ✓Mate

        I remember getting a written recipe for something (I can’t remember anything anymore) from my Grandma when I was young. I tried making it and it just wasn’t right. I asked her about it and she went through the directions from memory.

        We got to one ingredient and I told her how much I’d used and she said, “Well you don’t use that much.” I told her that’s what was on her card. She said, “It might be on there, but that’s not the right amount.”

        Her secrets were guarded tighter than Ft Knox!

        • CatHerder ✓fire! ✓fire!

          The only thing that didn’t survive Mom’s passing was her recipe for German chocolate cake. She only made it twice a year, Thanksgiving and Christmas. Wait, I take it back-her shrimp Creole was lost with her too. I’ve tried dozens of recipes for that and none tasted even vaguely the same.

          My own talent is bread, any kind from biscuits to baguettes. I’ve never had a bad batch. Lucky, I guess.

          • nc ✓s & balances

            That’s a talent!

      • TexasMom2012

        And the ever famous Blob. I have a written recipe from my aunt with a blob of cool whip! LOL

        • nc ✓s & balances

          I have a recipe written by my grandmother that says, “half an eggshell of water.”

          • WhoMeToo

            That’s awesome!!! XD

          • Patriot077

            Love it. Now would that be an eggshell cracked in half being filled with water or the cracked half being filled half full?

          • nc ✓s & balances

            That’s funny! I never questioned how she wrote it. But I know she meant an eggshell half, filled with water.

            But how big the egg? And the big or the little half? These were unimportant questions to her because she would add things until “they looked right.”

          • Patriot077

            That’s what I thought too, and it’s the inexactness of the old time recipes that let you know who the good cooks were. :)
            Same with my Mom. She never used a recipe and cooked the best meals. Her bread was out of this world. Everything was, actually. I’ve never been the kind of cook she was and I have to use recipes!

          • nc ✓s & balances

            My grandmother made cookies that I will never taste again, except in my mind. Some things can never be duplicated. Sigh.

          • Patriot077

            The moments we treasure in our hearts and minds long after they have passed on.

  • Republicanvet

    I wonder if that entire plate is Moochie approved. Meat? Seriously? Then there are the potatoes. And slow cooking in greasy animal fat? The portions also look too big, except for the carrots. I’m sure Moochie would demand more carrots.

  • YesterdayzNewz

    She’s learning to be less reliant on others for her needs. I say good job, Dana.

  • H50 ✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ

    Bless her heart. I wonder if Jasper gave a paws up?

    Always good to try new things.

  • Jack Deth

    Looks delicious!

    Crock Pots are wonderful devices.

    I lean more towards large aluminum, throw away pans for my meats and vegetable concoctions.

    Same end results. Different approach and flavors.

    Good luck keeping Jasper away!

    • TexasMom2012

      I have four crockpots. They are different sizes but come in handy at Thanksgiving. Love the luxury of throwing a meal together and then forgetting about it until dinner time.

      • nc ✓s & balances

        I bought one for $5 at a garage sale, it had what looked like a hairline crack in the ceramic glaze interior. I used it for over 20 years. It still works fine, but I finally replaced it with a new one last year.

        • Patriot077

          I still use the one my husband and I bought right after we were married. In 1975. It’s a hassle to clean it because the crock isn’t removable but it does a much better job than my new fangled one which I rarely use. :)

          • nc ✓s & balances

            Really? I like my new one. It’s oval shaped and easy to handle. Only $20. Works great.

    • John W.

      I have a crock pot,a toaster oven and a microwave, and consequently I don’t need to use my stove for very much. I am a 49-yr-old lifelong bachelor and have become quite the expert at cooking (assuming the word cooking includes making sandwiches).

    • http://1389blog.com/ 1389AD

      I don’t have room for a crock pot in my RV kitchenette. Sometimes I slow cook in a covered glass baking dish in my convection oven. I can’t cook large amounts that way, but then, there’s only two of us here.

  • PatrioticDissent

    I never understood why some people couldn’t cook. If you can read and follow directions, you can cook.

    • Jack Deth

      My sister and I would hang around the Kitchen whenever Mom got in a cooking or baking “mood”. Been living off what I learned ever since.

    • CatHerder ✓fire! ✓fire!

      Cooking is one thing, culinary genius is another. Not every fry chef is a cordan bleu.

      • John Thomas “Jack” Ward III

        Not every fry chef is a Graham Kerr (The “Galloping Gourmet”) or Gordon Ramsey…. But it’s fun to try…Jawamax 8<{D}

      • http://1389blog.com/ 1389AD

        There’s room in the world for fry chefs too!

    • mdtljt

      Sadly that’s not always the case..can’t tell you why but I know several people who can follow a recipe to the letter and the food is awful…bless their hearts…

      • Jocon307

        Sadly, that is me.

        • mdtljt

          Wanna impress at the next potluck? Look up Paula Deen’s Corn Casserole… It’s easy & awesome!!! Best way to cook, not bake, is to combine flavors you think would be good together..use a recipe as a guide but tailor it to your taste…and ALWAYS remember…you can always add more…you can NOT take it out… Happy Cooking!!!

        • John Thomas “Jack” Ward III

          Three words to encourage your cooking skills, Jocon:
          “PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT!” Jawamax 8<{D}

    • NRPax

      I have a friend whose pancakes made a distinct “thunk” sound when they hit the plate. Thankfully, she’s gotten better.

      But think about it: Cooking is just not taught as much any more. It’s considered “girl stuff” (if you’re a boy) or a “traditional gender role” (if you’re a girl). Never mind the fact that knowing your way around a kitchen is a good skill for self reliance.

      • Thale Taxurfeet

        “Cooking is just not taught as much any more. It’s considered “girl stuff” (if you’re a boy) or a “traditional gender role” (if you’re a girl). “

        Being a country boy who stoked his appetite for dutch oven cooking in the coals of campfires decades ago, I’d say that may be so for those folks who seldom venture past the concrete jungle. However, I can assure you that being in the woods doing the hunting, fishing, or other outdoorsy things for a week or two at a time and knowing how to cook, not to mention make tasty stuff from whatever you catch is a mighty fine talent and seldom considered girl stuff.

        A kitchen? Pfffft… If the wife had not thrown me out of the kitchen a few decades ago –some folks get right persnickety about the organization of the kitchen :-( — I’d consider cooking in a modern kitchen to be uptown, high zoot stuff!

        In any event, Congrats! to D. P. Well done madam.

        • TexasMom2012

          Yeah, the gang on my husband’s lease eat great! Got a nice huge metal grate over a large pit and of course your propane fryer.

          • Thale Taxurfeet

            Yessum… Sounds like the universal hunting camp kitchen.

      • John Thomas “Jack” Ward III

        Obviously, those people have never tried my Dad’s World famous Sauerbraten feast, which requires 3-4 days of Preparation and cooking. The last time I had it was when he lived in Colorado, in the Seventies. Jawamax 8<{D}

      • http://1389blog.com/ 1389AD

        Cooking on an outdoor grill was, and is, considered a manly art. Problem is, kids grow up in nanny state America where everybody’s afraid to let them work with sharp instruments, fire, and heat, which are essential to food preparation. Young children CAN learn to handle knives, stove burners, barbecue grills, and ovens safely under adult supervision.

        • NRPax

          Cooking on an outdoor grill was, and is, considered a manly art.

          I don’t disagree and I suppose I should have been more clear. I was only referring to cooking in a kitchen being thought of in such poor regard. I’ve read articles on how a lot of college students have absolutely no clue how to cook a meal which is pretty sad.

          • Julia B

            My younger brother was in college at K U and living in an apartment. He was trying to make sloppy Joes. He called the university help line to find out what “brown” the hamburger meant. LOL

          • NRPax

            Please tell me that he learned.

    • Katie Smith

      This is true. Most should be able to follow a written recipe. However, there are some good reasons why many can’t or why it’s difficult and takes a lot of practice (I know from experience): 1) if you aren’t a regular cooker you may not have the appliances the recipes call for and that can be daunting because an inexperienced cooker won’t know how to replace the appliance with a manual action; 2) There is a LOT of cooking terminology that an inexperienced cooker can find intimidating. You really have to do some reading and study to understand how to follow recipes; and 3) Cooking — even following a recipe — really involves a specific part of the brain and it requires focus. An inexperienced cooker can find it very stressful and anxiety-inducing to juggle all the parts that go into making a successful meal from a recipe. They might barely scrape through one recipe and become so anxious that they vow never to try again which only perpetuates their lack of experience. Bottom line: it really isn’t as easy for a person with little or no cooking experience as it seems to you.

      • TexasMom2012

        I remember having to ask what Oleo was when I was learning to cook in the seventies. It was a term from before my time.

        • Katie Smith

          Oh wow, Oleo really is a throwback, isn’t it? My mom didn’t use that but we did use Crisco and I haven’t seen Crisco in probably 20 years. Folks are more health conscious nowadays and go for natural plant and nut oils to cook with (and fruit oils! I use a lot of coconut oil in cooking). More expensive but so much better for the body.

          • nc ✓s & balances

            There used to be a recipe on the Quaker Oatmeal box for oatmeal cookies that was THE BEST and it used Crisco. I made those cookies for years then suddenly they changed the recipe and substituted butter for the Crisco. The cookies were totally different, not special anymore. Not good, in fact.

          • Katie Smith

            That’s the problem with these harmful fats: they make food really, really delicious. So delicious that we can’t give them up (at least not easily). Same for Oreos. They taste incredible but contain horrible fats. And McDonalds. I mean, Big Macs are insanely delicious but are a health nightmare.

            The only way to bridge the gap between taste and healthy eating is to actually RE-TRAIN the body on what true “good taste” is. I guarantee you, if you only ever had those cookies made with butter you would love them just the same. For about a year I’ve been in the process of slowly removing bad stuff from my eating habits. The biggest difficultly by far has been giving up gluten (I have a gluten sensitivity), but I also have given up corn oil (and all vegetable oil), and am slowly moving away from sugar. Sugar is meant to be a treat but in reality sugar is in almost everything we put in our bodies — from drinks to sauces to table condiments to breads to desserts. You CAN make delicious desserts using no sugar at all — using things like brown rice syrup for sweetener. But you have to re-train your body to love the taste of these desserts until you’re able to stop thinking about pumpkin pie or Dairy Queen or cupcakes or whatever one’s weakness is. It takes time and dedication, but man does it start to feel really, really good.

          • nc ✓s & balances

            You’re absolutely right, of course. I went through a major weight loss program about ten years ago that involved a new way of thinking about food, and it put me on a new path. I’m not as strict anymore as I used to be, but I don’t keep ice cream and cookies in the house anymore, and I stick to fresh, homemade and healthy meals as much as possible. I very rarely do fast food.

            Those oatmeal cookies were in my “pre-healthy eating”

      • nc ✓s & balances

        Very good points. This is why the short instructional videos that come with some internet recipes are so helpful. It simplifies things when you can see how it’s done. Confidence is key!

        • Katie Smith

          I just saw on TV the other day that Jessica Seinfeld (Jerry’s missus) has put out a new cookbook specially designed for people who can’t cook! It’s got some unusual title that I can’t remember and apparently she has a section where she actually explains in simple language about basic cooking techniques (like basting or blanching or sautéing) and other basics. She wrote it specifically to be used by a person who has never cracked open a cook book and basically is clueless in the kitchen.

      • stellatruman

        When I was 23 , someone gave me the Silver Pallette Cookbook…I didn’t recognize most of the ingredients back then, so I gave it away. I have improved my skills a lot since then and have taught 2 of my 3 daughters to cook..the third is reluctantly learning now. My oldest has a lot of talent , the middle is well on her way. I have noticed a trend of young professional women usually have zero interest in cooking , but mine thankfully, are both educated and can cook

    • stellatruman

      But if your cookware is crap, then the food will be too, and then people get discouraged

      • Katie Smith

        This is so true. And cookware can be SO expensive. A good idea is to scour websites like Craigs List for freebies and sales on used items, or join Freecycle for your city/town. Freecycle is a great resource for exchanging used things totally for free. You can offer things to give away and you can ask for things you need. Everything is used and sometimes people try to get rid of something that is real crap. But you can score great things, too. I scored an Ikea day bed that had been used by the owner 10 times. All the sheets, comforter and pillows came with it. All beautiful and in mint condition. 100% Free. A friend scored an electric frying pan that was identical to the one her grandmother used in the 60’s. Her GRANDMOTHER. And it works like it was just bought off the shelf. Those appliances made 40, 50, 60 years ago were made with exceptional quality. So anyone who wants to really learn cooking needs to find some of those online resources and get some good, used stuff. Yard sales and estate sales are also a great way to get appliances for cheap.

        • stellatruman

          sounds great ! Some women like expensive jewelry , I prefer nice cookware. It pays off too :) There are some pretty decent products out there made by companies that are pricey and holy grail cookware. I bought my daughter a stockpot ( she is making soups now ) It had a brand name I think of Emeril , but it was made by All clad.

          • Katie Smith

            Emeril is a chef with a TV show. The brand name is All Clad. Nowadays the celebrity chefs put their names on product lines that they didn’t actually create. They just put their name on there as a way of promoting the products and then they get a cut of the profits or something. A brand endorsed by a celeb chef might mean the products really are superior and the chef really believes in them … or it could mean that brand just offered that chef a really, really lucrative contract and it wouldn’t matter to the chef who the brand was so long as the money was real good.

          • stellatruman

            Yes , I know who is is ( his pic was on the box too )It was just a less expensive product made by all clad, but for a beginner, it was a nice deal. Sometimes, I think certain pieces are all made from same source , but stamped with Calphalon , All class, Ciusinart , etc..

    • GaryTheBrave

      What I did to a frozen pizza was downright criminal.

      I just watched the finale of Hells Kitchen and saw these two women create 5 dishes in one hour using no recipes. In one hour I can create a 5-alarm fire in a kitchen.

      • John Thomas “Jack” Ward III

        That was me in the mid-to-late Seventies… Pay Attention to what you’re cooking, especially if you’re FRYING something! Jawamax 8<{D}

    • BAW

      It’s not that I “can’t” cook, it’s just that I have no natural talent for it and some weird knack for, anything I can do wrong I will at some point.

      I had the recipe and personal instructions but I still went through several bags of sugar before I learned to make my mother’s fudge. Now I’m the “pro” but only my kids eat it when it still comes out as spoon or rock fudge. I only take it to the rest of the family when I get it right. Made two good batches at Thanksgiving and then the third turned out a little soft (think I let the burner heat a little too long).

      I contend being a really good cook is an art. Just being able to do the basics and getting edible results is all reading and following directions will get you, imo.

  • FedUpLibBS

    LOve Pot Roast in Crockpot. Gets almost as much work as my Microwave (which also does a pretty good Pot Roast)!!

    • nc ✓s & balances

      Pot Roast in a microwave? Noooooo!

    • Katie Smith

      Crock pots (aka “slow cookers”) are just awesome. I recently became a slow cooker convert. It has literally changed my life.

  • Grumblton

    Too funny. Thousands of responses on her facebook post, not sure how many but must be major, on twitter. It’s just a slow cooker, throw-together for us ordinary moms. Makes me smile. :)

    • stellatruman

      me too ! I just want to teach her to cook

      • TexasMom2012

        Want to send her some easy, really easy recipes! I have some good ones that a six year old could make and be really good.

  • Garym

    The best crockpot recipe:
    Spanish Chicken
    skinless, boneless chicken breast and thighs
    1 large can of whole tomatoes drained
    1 12oz beer of your choice
    1 small can of tomato paste
    paprika
    2 tbs of sweet basil
    2 tbs of oregano
    3 cloves fresh garlic (minced)
    2 bay leaves
    large jar of pimento stuffed olives
    Season chicken with paprika and place in bottom of crock pot. Combine beer, tomato paste, basil, oregano, chopped garlic, by leaves and some brine from the olives in a mixing bowl. Quarter the tomatoes and add to crock pot. Add Olives to crock pot. Pour beer and tomato paste mixture over chicken, tomatoes and olives. Cover and cook on low for 5 to 6 hours. No need to salt. Enjoy!

    • Garym

      Forgot to add:
      Serve over rice or wide egg noodles.

    • stellatruman

      I use beer when I make pulled pork in the crockpot..yum

      • Garym

        I’m going to try that!

      • FedUpLibBS

        Beer goes in the COOK … NOT the Cooker!!!

        • NRPax

          No no…you just don’t cook with beer you wouldn’t drink. Same rule for wine.

          • stellatruman

            It was a Sam Adams beer, so I think it was ok

        • stellatruman

          you’d be surprised !

      • Zakasnak

        I use Dr Pepper for my pulled pork… YUM!

        http://crockingirls.com/recipes/dr-pepper-pulled-pork/

        • stellatruman

          I think the first recipe I tried called for that , but I didn’t have that so I used a beer

    • NRPax

      I know this was posted three days ago but I wanted to tell you that I copied your recipe and sent it to my wife. We put it to use tonight and it came out pretty good. So thank you!

  • marion vega

    you didn’t cook that. the oven made that happen

  • Katie Smith

    Crock pots (real name: “Slow cooker”) are AWESOME. I recently bought one when I got a gluten-free and paleo cook book for my birthday. All the recipes are for use with a slow cooker. I’ve made 3 recipes already and they ALL turned out beautifully. Just fantastic. It has radically changed my diet and eating habits. I can’t cook, so the slow cooker is the way to go for me.

  • fcalsnoe

    A hot Latina could make you a real dinner not this poor excuse. The fat globules are floating on top and the meat is shredded and very few vegetables. Sorry Dana as a chef I’d be going to Esmeraldas house not yours.

  • nc ✓s & balances

    Well done, Dana! Slow cookers are the best, I use mine about once a week. Last thing I made was a pot roast, in fact. So simple! Cut up a onion, put in bottom, add a cup of chicken stock (or bullion), salt and pepper a beef brisket (1.5 lbs or so), cover and set it on Low for about 8 hours. Serve over mashed potatoes or rice. (You can add those little carrots with the onions if you like, just make sure the veggies go on the bottom.)

    These days with the internet, you don’t need cookbooks anymore. There are so many great websites to find easy or gourmet recipes, whatever you like. Many have short videos so you can see exactly how to do it.

    My go to site is: Allrecipes.com

    • John Thomas “Jack” Ward III

      For our boarding house, my room-mate Dave’s Fiance (Who lives near Atlanta) brought us a Glass “Convection Oven” which they use to cook Chicken, Steak, Pork, burgers, and even Pizza. But I get quite a bit of scorn for using the conventional oven…. Jawamax 8<{D}

  • deimos19

    next time add a couple tablespoons of instant mashed potato flakes at the end of the cooking. it thickens the broth a bit.

  • Tessa I.

    Congrats, ma’am! My mom is an exceptional cook, and now that I’m living on my own post-college, I’m having to figure out my own cooking and occasionally failing miserably. Pot roast is a small victory, but hey, it’s still a victory. I was over the moon when I made my first challah!

    • John Thomas “Jack” Ward III

      Okay, quick survey:What was the first thing you EVER attempted to cook? My first attempt was Minestone soup (with a few extra ingredients) when I was five years old….Despite the fact that it sickened me, my mom made me eat the whole pot.. But I turned out to be a pretty good cook anyway… Jawamax 8<{D}

  • Milos Gamelin III™

    I can tell that the carrots aren’t done.

  • froggy19510

    Who cooked the game her father broght home? It is unimagianable to think a girl from Wyoming that doesn’t know how to cook. But you did good just the same. Next you should try frying steak.

  • Michelle ✓classified

    Slow cookers are the best. Made a huge batch of chili in mine just yesterday. Another yummy meal I cook it in is boneless pork ribs w/ BBQ sauce cooked all day – amazing!

  • G21

    Know liberty. Sow liberty’s seeds. Reap the rewards: http://www.savageleft.com/resources/beacon.html

  • http://www.jlptalk.com James Anton Hake

    Women really are happier in the kitchen.

    • John Thomas “Jack” Ward III

      “It’s our anniversary coming up, my wife says, ‘I wanna go someplace I’ve never been before.” I said, “Try the Kitchen.”” #HennyYoungman #Goodfellas XD LOL Jawamax 8<{D}

  • Charles Hammond Jr

    I’m a mid-level IT worker. I can work with code, fix webservers, resurrect computers, etc.

    Can’t cook for beans. Hell… I can’t even cook beans.

    I’m impressed.

    • John Thomas “Jack” Ward III

      Or, to paraphrase a joke I heard back in the seventies….
      “He can’t boil water without burning it… He calls it ‘Soup.'” XD LOL Jawamax 8<{D}

  • Dencal26

    Now Dana is complete. Smart, Beautiful and she can cook too!!!

  • John Thomas “Jack” Ward III

    Question, out of Curiosity:Can she cook Italian, or make a full Thanksgiving Turkey dinner? In my family, both the Irish and Italian sides are/were excellent cooks! And it looks delicious, Dana! Jawamax 8<{D}

    • therealguyfaux ✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ

      Lord, please forgive me and all the pygmies in New Guinea, but I’ve heard tell that “Irish” food is the only cuisine that improves with the adding of ketchup to it. (Except maybe “bacon & cabbage”– the real Irish bacon– not the American kind– and definitely none o’ that Americanized corned beef and cabbage nonsense! But to that, ya gotta add a li’l mustard or maybe jes’ a pinch o’ powdered ginger.)

      • Thale Taxurfeet

        “I’ve heard tell that “Irish” food is the only cuisine that improves with the adding of ketchup”

        During my time in uniform I discovered that when the food is prepared by certain kitchens/cooks, Irish or otherwise, there is little that is not improved by ketchup*.

        * Hunts, not Heinz ketchup

    • Thale Taxurfeet

      “Can she cook Italian, or make a full Thanksgiving Turkey dinner? In my family, both the Irish and Italian sides are/were excellent cooks!”

      Heh… Both my Irish and Scottish sides of the family are fair at preparing food. From field to table.

      Come to think of it, both sides are right adept at washing the meal down. 😉

      And since everyone is talking cookbooks in the thread, I’ll offer this link to a good selection of cookbooks compiled by those either in the military, former military, family, friends and so on. I believe I have one or a couple of recipes in one of the listed cookbooks. But I’ll not say which one since it might depress sales of that particular one.

      Everyone ought to buy a cookbook or two and give a little donation to a reputable organization that helps our vets. After all, ’tis the season to give.

      • nc ✓s & balances

        VERY cool! Thanks for the tip!

        • Thale Taxurfeet

          *tips hat* You are welcome.

          Pass the site info on. Proceeds go towards good works for those who at one time wrote a blank check payable to the U.S. of A. for an amount up to, and including their life.

  • Codewizard

    Better at cooking than at communicating.

    • seek456

      hmmm, you’re communicating your left wing hate persona? How special.

  • Spasmolytic

    Just another reason for feminists to hate her — she cooks!

  • eveh

    One 3 lb pork or beef roast, add whole jar porcinnie peppers, juice and all. cook 6-8 hours on high. Great for sandwiches. Pull it for pulled pork. Love my crock pot.