A snippet from Yahoo Finance:

“I’m in anger management because I hit a former co-worker.”

“I’ve had candidates share with me their anger management problems, views on gender, age, and other things that can be damaging in an interview,” says Shilonda Downing, owner of Virtual Work Team, which helps business owners find remote workers. “One candidate recently mentioned that he was going through anger management for hitting a co-worker in corporate America, and that is why he would like to work from home going forward.”

Major character flaws, particularly when they are of the physical-harm variety, shouldn’t be brought up in an interview. Bringing up disagreements with colleagues or managers as a reason for leaving a former employer doesn’t bode well that you’ll be reliable and reasonable in a new position–even if it is a remote one. “Mentioning this is typically deemed as someone who is unable to handle situations professionally and without violence,” Downing says. Unless you’re required to disclose that you’re undergoing some kind of psychological treatment, find an honest way to work around it.

How many of us are aware of their major character flaws? Anyway, the advice to stay away from oversharing is sound, and there’s much more of it at the article.