Nobody serves up a hot take quite like Matt Yglesias. And today, once again, he did not disappoint.

Not that anyone asked him for his thoughts, but Yglesias weighed in on the furor over Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar’s most recent anti-Semitic remarks. Apparently the fact that even some congressional Democrats are calling Omar out is evidence that Omar was actually kinda right about those wealthy Jews and their influence:

Welp.

Which article? You mean this one?

This should be good:

The specifics of the controversy of the moment (“Omar ignites new anti-Semitism controversy with comments on AIPAC,” according to Politico) relate to some moderately ill-advised tweets Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) fired off Sunday night. But the tweets themselves only arose in the larger context of what was already a push from Republican leaders to label Omar and Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) as anti-Semitic over their view on Israel policy. That’s not a novel tactic to anyone familiar with the discourse around this subject, but it’s taken on a new urgency in the current Congress for two parallel reasons.

Just some “moderately ill-advised tweets,” you guys.

More:

That said, while it’s true that to suggest a cabal of Jewish moneymen control Congress from behind the scenes via their perfidious financial influence certainly does traffic in anti-Semitic stereotypes, it’s also clearly true that pro-Israel forces’ financial clout makes a difference in American politics.

Don’t take my word for it — ask AIPAC, which says that “the United States Congress has provided Israel with the strongest support of any institution in the world” and tells its members that “involvement in the political process is a tangible way of showing friends of Israel that you care about who serves in Congress.” It also specifically defines this in terms of being sufficiently generous with your campaign contributions to qualify as a member of AIPAC’s Congressional Club.

Yeah, let’s ask AIPAC:

Oh. Well, at least Matt got that attention he was after, so it wasn’t a total loss, right?