Joe Biden’s been consulting his binders and has already found some real gems to serve in his administration.

Totally serious person Robin Givhan writes:

There are some who might argue that in making these announcements, it would be just fine to let the images speak for themselves. They tell the story of diversity in gender and race and ethnicity. They reflect the composition of the country. According to the Biden website, of those folks considered senior staff members, 17 are women and seven are men. The economics team is made up of four women and two men. The communications team is all women. Those who are advising him on the coronavirus pandemic are a diverse lot, too.

It wouldn’t seem necessary for Biden to stand onstage and verbally draw attention to every dramatic first or every incremental progression on the road to full inclusivity or gender parity. That simply by choosing Janet L. Yellen to lead the Treasury Department and asking the Nigerian-born and California-raised Wally Adeyemo to serve as her deputy, Biden has said all that’s necessary. But sometimes people see without comprehension. Sometimes, they don’t even see.

Biden acknowledged the South Asian heritage of Neera Tanden, his nominee to head the Office of Management and Budget, and said, “She believes what I believe — that a budget should reflect our values.” As Yellen sat listening to Biden’s introduction, with her platinum bob precisely matching her white jacket and its popped collar, she looked every bit the experienced wise woman. But the impact of her nomination only truly unfurls when Biden says that she is “one of the most important economic thinkers of our time,” and also the first woman to head the Treasury since its first secretary, Alexander Hamilton, took the oath in 1789. And then Biden adds that he needs to get Lin-Manuel Miranda to write a sequel to “Hamilton” and title it “Yellen.” Biden got a good chuckle out of that one.

In allowing each nominee to speak, Biden was symbolically making room for the voices of others, for the voices of experts, in his administration. He is the lead in this story, but his supporting characters have heft. When the national security team was introduced last month, the four men and two women stood onstage together. All of the men wore blue ties. The president-elect distinguished himself with his crisp trifold white pocket square. Harris opted for a plum-colored suit instead of one in navy or black. They made a cohesive picture.

Givhan deserves kudos, too. For managing to type those words while drooling profusely.

In any event, from what we can gather, Givhan is trying to show us that Joe Biden’s administration will be a breath of fresh air. Unfortunately, as Stephen L. Miller points out, the headline set her up to fail miserably:

Joe Biden’s administration is shaping up to be as swampy and status-quo-y as can be. Which is actually perfectly in line with the modern-day Democratic Party.

It’s funny because it’s true.