Despite widespread news reports, including from CNN, that demonstrators outside the White House were tear-gassed and hit with rubber bullets to make way for President Trump’s photo-op in front of St. John’s Church, the U.S. Park Police deny tear gas was deployed. (PBS News’ Yamiche Alcindor was there and tweeted that she was definitely tear-gassed.) The media doesn’t seem to mind lumping smoke canisters and pepper balls under “tear gas” — you know, “Facts First.”

And about those lockdowns? We’ve also been told by Mayor Bill de Blasio that protesting 400 years of racism in America isn’t comparable to going back to church services or reopening your small business. And as Twitchy reported, dozens signed a letter declaring white supremacy “a lethal public health issue” and therefore justifying the lack of social distancing at protests.

Put those two narratives together and you have this: A study shows that “widespread” use of tear gas could make the coronavirus pandemic worse.

We might be wrong, but that doesn’t even look like tear gas in the photo the Times chose. Close enough we guess.

So you’re saying the use of tear gas isn’t as “widespread” as reported?

What about the effects on the respiratory system of setting fire to an AutoZone full of tires and car batteries and watching it burn?

Related: