Tom Nichols, a former Republican, a current Never Trumper, and the author of “The Death of Expertise,” is plagued by the Washington Examiner appearing in his mailbox even though he never subscribed to it.

Oh, this piece by Becket Adams, where he writes about the damage the media did to itself over the past two years hyping the Mueller investigation?

If hundreds of thousands of viewers are renouncing the opinion and commentary shows that went all-in on collusion, the same has probably happened to newsrooms that pursued the charge with similar zeal. The problem here isn’t about declining subscriptions and revenues, it’s that many Americans are emerging from this news debacle with an even deeper distrust for institutions that are supposed to keep them informed of the goings-on of the powerful. This means the powerful can probably now move more freely and with little fear of the disinfecting qualities of the news spotlight. The collusion bust will also lead to more voters treating the reality that enemy powers interfere in our politics as if it were wild fantasy.

But what can you expect when you hype a false story for two years?

We don’t see anything in there about the investigation hurting America, just the media’s mishandling of it.

The piece is still up if Nichols can debase himself enough to read it.


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