Here’s another example of your tax dollars at work supporting NPR — they’re pushing the propaganda of a group called Florida Clinicians for Climate Action, who claim that people are suffering because of dangerously hot temperatures in the state.

And to repeat the punchline of a well-worn joke, women and minorities are hardest hit.

We honestly feel bad for Jorge, who has diabetes and cancer — neither one connected to warm temperatures — who says working out in the sun in Florida makes things hard. You see, “When you work in the streets, you really feel the change” — and if that’s not proof of climate change, what is?

“… an increase in illnesses exacerbated by climate change in low-income neighborhoods.” We thought climate change affected the entire planet equally, but it looks like it zooms in on poor neighborhoods.

NPR reports:

… People who can’t afford air conditioning find it more difficult to sleep, which can contribute to obesity. Exposure to high nighttime temperatures also makes it harder for the body to recover from daytime heat, which can result in “in heat-related illness and death,” according to the National Climate Assessment. Holder says her patients have air conditioners if they can afford them, but they’re often old and dangerously moldy.

On top of those concerns, climate change is fueling larger and more powerful hurricanes, storms that can damage flimsier homes, like Jorge’s. People with limited means might also be reluctant to go to shelters because they aren’t able to buy the necessary supplies of food and water. And the storms themselves can also lead to post-traumatic stress disorder.

So climate change is both making people fat by making it harder to sleep, and more powerful storms are giving people PTSD.

This article gave us PTSD.

“Taking climate change into consideration means that Holder is more likely to ask her patients who work outdoors about dehydration, for example, or to take a longer allergy season into account when treating those with respiratory ailments whose medicines are no longer keeping up with their symptoms,” NPR reports.

So how much hotter is it in Florida because of man-made climate change?

So what they’re saying, then, is Miami has really warm weather.

Without it, Jorge has nothing to sell.

They need to learn a computer programming language. And the difference between weather and climate change.

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