After presidential candidate Ben Carson recently said it was fine with him if people flew the Confederate flag on private property, conservative website Campus Reform reported that Goldie Taylor tweeted a simple “Gosh” along with a link to the story. In reply to Taylor, University of Pennsylvania Professor Anthea Butler tweeted, “If only there was a ‘coon of the year’ award…”

if-only-there-was-a-coon-of-the-year-award

It’s a shame that Hillary Clinton is too shy to share the emails detailing her yoga routines, so we’ll have to make due with Mediaite’s Tommy Christopher twisting himself into pretzels to explain that conservatives completely misinterpreted Butler’s tweet.

No, she didn’t, says Christopher, who explains that “if you want to interpret Professor Butler’s tweet that way, you’re welcome to do so, but to state that interpretation as fact is just plain wrong. In fact, maybe you’re the racist for reading that tweet and assuming that she meant Ben Carson is a ‘coon.’ There’s another much more relevant interpretation to be made.”

And that is? Well, you see, whites and blacks have a completely different interpretation of the word, which most conservative sites described as “racist” and “offensive.” If you want to uncover the real definition, you need to consult the experts at — we’re not making this up — Coonwatch.com, which lists, watches and tracks “those who live by the coon code of conduct,” such as Carson.

“The term doesn’t have universal currency within the black community,” explains Christopher, “but it is universally understood. It’s intended to be provocative, offensive, and even insulting, but it’s not a racist term.” One caveat: “… it’s still racist when white people say it.”

We think it’s safe to say that Christopher taught all of us something today.