Rights schmights. The Internal Revenue Service can do whatever it wants. As if the threat of a tax audit weren’t intimidating enough, the IRS can seize your property without ever charging you with violating the law. Having these people in charge of your healthcare is going to be awesome

The IRS seizing someone’s life savings? Surely this person was charged with some sort of crime, right?

Nope.

The IRS: the customer service of the DMV, the efficiency of the Post Office, and the ruthlessness of the Mafia.

You know an instance of federal tyranny is pretty bad if The New York Times is being critical of it.

Using a law designed to catch drug traffickers, racketeers and terrorists by tracking their cash, the government has gone after run-of-the-mill business owners and wage earners without so much as an allegation that they have committed serious crimes. The government can take the money without ever filing a criminal complaint, and the owners are left to prove they are innocent. Many give up.

Whoa.

The practice has swept up dairy farmers in Maryland, an Army sergeant in Virginia saving for his children’s college education and Ms. Hinders, 67, who has borrowed money, strained her credit cards and taken out a second mortgage to keep her restaurant going.

Their money was seized under an increasingly controversial area of law known as civil asset forfeiture, which allows law enforcement agents to take property they suspect of being tied to crime even if no criminal charges are filed. Law enforcement agencies get to keep a share of whatever is forfeited. (emphasis added)

So basically law enforcement agencies are rewarded for seizing the property of people who have committed no crime.

Heads they win; tails you lose.

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