New York City students flunk new Common Core-aligned tests; Bloomberg cheers

New York City’s first batch of Common Core test results are out. And the results are not impressive.

The lousy results haven’t dampened New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s enthusiasm:

If you’re wondering why the scores were so bad, check out one of the questions for third-graders from the New York State Common Core Sample Questions (page 8):

There were 54 apples set aside as a snack for 3 classes of students. The teachers divided up the apples and placed equal amounts on 9 separate trays. If each of the 3 classes received the same number of trays, how many apples did each class get?

A) 2
B) 6
C) 18
D) 27

We’re all for rigor, but we are talking here about a test for third-graders, most of whom probably have not even mastered their times tables.

Here are some comments posted by Facebook users in response to the question above:

“Horribly confusing. Even I want to say 6 were on each tray, instead of 18 per class.”

“That’s a really confusing way to get to 54 divided by 3.”

“Ridiculous!!! Trickery or testing? Borders on sadistic”

“What was wrong with old fashioned arithmetic? Basic, straightforward, and easy to learn. Why did that go away?”

“that is hilarious because when taught I had 9th graders who couldn’t divided 10 by 2.”

“I am a teacher and I think the 2nd sentence and the 1st part of the 3rd sentence is unnecessary. Who cares about trays!! Quit confusing children”

“Absolutely ridiculous!!!!”

“TMI.”

“the whole point is to get them frustrated, cry and just give up, they then feel like a failure, hate school, start acting angry at home, depressed, and you watch your child change before your eyes.”

We wish we could tell you Common Core math gets better as children get older. Unfortunately, as Twitchy reported, Houghton-Mifflin’s Common Core-aligned Algebra 1 textbook is a mess, too.

And then there’s this, in case you missed it:

And this:

Welcome to the new age.

Related:

Michelle Malkin: My child’s Common Core-aligned Algebra book is crap

  • Jeremy

    Common Core is garbage.

    • David Ruiz

      I have no opinion on Common Core but what is the answer? How do we test the kids for progess?

      • Ronald Green

        What was so hard about just saying what is 54 divided by 3? Or “There are 54 apples to be divided between 3 classes. How many does each class get if we divide them evenly?”. What was all the confusing verbiage for except to confuse and frustrate? Common core isn’t about improving education standards as much as it is about pushing a new liberal ‘social justice’ agenda.

        • David Ruiz

          So you just do not like the wording Common Core used or are you against it as a whole? I really am not familiar with it at all. I suspect the question was hand picked to prove a point but like I said, my kid that is just going into 3rd grade this year got it right.

          • Vickie DHaene

            You should do some research. It is straight out of Brave New World.

            It should scare the Hell out of you.

          • Ronald Green

            I’m very happy you and your kid got it right. You should be involved with his/her education. However, Common core is about more than improving our children’s education, if it’s even about that at all. If a ‘new order’ want’s to push it’s agenda, the best place to start is with the children. Research what the Communists did in Russia and China and the Nazis did in Germany. Is the Liberal ‘social justice’ agenda that insidious? I don’t know, but I don’t trust anyone or any group that seeks to push it’s agenda through propaganda and ‘new’ education. I have come to trust US liberals less and less with their group thought and mindless adoration of people like Obama. I seriously distrust anyone involved in a cult of personality such as the one that exists now. It should scare any intelligent person.

          • http://www.vatican.va/ Rulz

            Then you need to get familiar with it. It’s a disaster.

            A big problem with schools is administration and government interfering in the student-teacher relationship.

        • frgough

          Precisely. The question is ridiculously complex. Here’s a word problem from my college calculus textbook:

          A storage tank in the shape of an inverted right circular cone has a radius of 4 meters and a height of 8 meters. It is filled to a height of 6 meters with olive oil (density = 920 kg/m^3). In order to bottle the olive oil, it is first necessary to pump it to the top of the tank. How much work is done in accomplishing this?

          Note that this word problem involves some seriously advanced mathematics, but is clear, precise, to the point and doesn’t try to trick me with irrelevant information.

          The fools writing these common core questions are idiots.

        • Rudy

          Don’t know anything about Common Core but a great deal about Common Sense. The problem was a good one. Better suited for 5th or 6th grade students and I might add was looking for far more than 54 divided by 3. In real life, you have to know how to recognize and omit the ” verbiage / garbage ” and only pull out that which is needed to solve the problem.
          Just saying ( what is 54 divided by 3 ) is telling the student it is a division problem. Many word problems, depending on what you are looking for, will give set data and the student must be able to pull only that info needed to solve the problem.

          • JR48

            When you’re in third grade?

          • Nimble Librarian

            I agree. Thanks

      • Vickie DHaene

        Then you are one of the Uninformed.

        Do your homework.
        How about just teach the kids and stop worrying about testing.

      • http://www.vatican.va/ Rulz

        …..with the methods that have previously been shown to work?

  • Maxwell

    But hey, at least they get gold stars for trying!

    • PatriotRG

      every ones a winner – hurray

    • MNWoman

      I worked at a daycare center as a summer job a few years ago. There was a pre-k teacher who absolutely refused to do a reward system for his students because he said there is no reason to give kids rewards for doing things they should be doing anyway or behaving the way they are supposed to. I thought, finally, someone who doesn’t think kids should be rewarded for having basic manners or as a form of bribery. He was exactly right.

      • Maxwell

        The guy I do Bible study with always says, “You don’t get gold stars for doing what you’re suppose to.” Rewarded kids for doing what their suppose to do, or being nice, or etc. creates a.. can’t think of the word, so I’m gonna with entitled mentality.

      • Rudy

        Give that teacher a gold star…

      • Tex

        After my son’s first day in kindergarten, his teacher sent him home with a bag of candy as a reward for being ‘good’. I took the candy back to her the next day and told her nicely that he will not be rewarded for something that is expected of him. This teacher wound up being a good friend of the family. My son is now 26 and is a middle school teacher. I hope he remembers that lesson from kindergarten.

  • Maxx

    I have a great question for the exam.

    “Divide the number of ounces required to fill a Big Gulp by the total amount of judges who have, essentially, declared Bloomberg an idiot and what is the correct answer?”

    INFINITY TIMES INFINITY!

    • AZGunslinger

      Boooooooom!

    • AZGunslinger

      Boooooooom!

  • Todd St John

    I’ve taught HS Math for 27 years and I am not a fan of common core. I have the good fortune to teach in Texas where we didn’t adopt it.

    That said there is absolutely nothing wrong with that question. Rigor means testing problem solving skills as well as math skills. Yes there is too much information in that question, which is the point. Students have to determine which information is necessary and which is extraneous before making the computation.

    We see the same types of questions on our state tests. Don’t blame common core for this. If you don’t like it blame everyone who bashes Public Schools as “dumbed down”.

    • Lady 12

      This isn’t rigorous, it’s basic math crud.

    • Nick M.

      I remember those word problems about 20 years ago in school. Not just basic math but reading comprehension to filter out the unnecessary BS. It’s actually pretty good as frankly our students *should* learn how to filter out the BS. But at least this shows just how dumbed down our students have become.

      • Catchance

        Wait. This was a test for third graders. I’m pretty sure I was learning multiplication tables in 3rd grade. Whether or not I could have done it then, it took me a minute just now to wade through the garbage and get to 6 x 3.

        • plumberskid

          Nothing personal but that’s because you’re old and rusty. You probably haven’t had to do math without a calculator in 40 years.

          • Catchance

            Whaddya mean, nothing personal? I may be old and I may be rusty, but…. wait. What was I going to say? I forget.

            (No, it actually only took me a few seconds. My point was that third graders are just learning multiplication and division and this gave extraneous information that not only wasn’t needed but confused the issue.)

          • Catchance

            Whaddya mean, nothing personal? I may be old and I may be rusty, but…. wait. What was I going to say? I forget.

            (No, it actually only took me a few seconds. My point was that third graders are just learning multiplication and division and this gave extraneous information that not only wasn’t needed but confused the issue.)

          • http://twitter.com/thetugboatphil TugboatPhil

            Oddly enough, I was actually “ciphering” on paper yesterday, and I first learned my multiplication tables in 1964. Last evening I was watching local news and there was a story about a middle school getting laptops for this school year. The teacher interviewed was quoted as saying, “We’re never going back to pencil and paper.”

            Hasn’t she ever heard of EMP blast at high altitude?

          • rickg62

            Great point on the perils of the reliance on electronic technology. There’s a great, albeit long, article on the American Thinker site warning of this in relation to the discontinued teaching of cursive in schools as brought forth in the testimony of Rachel Jeantel in the Zimmerman trial.

          • JR48

            Or merely ‘dead batteries’?

          • peggypie

            math is math- there is only one answer. the whole point is to get the right answer. THE easiest way kids can get to the right answer is what we should be doing right? i mean seriously- why make math that much more complicated.

          • jaimo

            Yes, but in today’s screwls you have to get to the correct answer and show your work in the exact way the government teacher wants to see it. My husband used to help our son with algebra questions and the method that my husband learned was different from what the screwls were teaching, my son found the old way was easier to understand and when he used the older method he was marked wrong on his paper, even though the answer was right.

          • rickg62

            Old doesn’t mean rusty. I’m 64 and can still add up a column of numbers faster in my head than I can input them into a calculator.

          • jaimo

            Well, maybe you can but I type 125 words a minute and can operate a calculator at least that fast, I’ll beat ya, old guy. Just kidding, I’m 51 and I understand exactly what you’re talking about. These kids are useless if they don’t have an electronic item stuck to their hand. However, if the cash register died, I’d be able to make change for sure.

        • plumberskid

          Nothing personal but that’s because you’re old and rusty. You probably haven’t had to do math without a calculator in 40 years.

        • Matt Lewis

          Actually it was 6 divided by 3. Giving a final answer of 2 apples per tray, per class. I won’t pretend to know what exactly this common core crap is, but anything that makes our kids think faster and use their brain is a good thing. Kids today are stupid, especially in urban areas where school is used as a baby sitter.

          • yolds

            Matt, Read the question again –
            “There were 54 apples set aside as a snack for 3 classes of students. The teachers divided up the apples and placed equal amounts on 9 separate trays. If each of the 3 classes received the same number of trays, how many apples did each class get?”
            Where do you get 6 divided by 3??
            Scrap the BS and the question asks “What is 54 divided by 3” which of course the answer is 18
            just sayin’

          • Jim Rasmussen

            My guess is he took the 54 and divided it by 9 trays and got 6 apples per tray. Then, maybe, he saw the phrase “divided up” in the problem and thought he had to divide the 6 by the 3 classes. It was always interesting when I taught high school math trying to figure out students’ thought processes when they did an algebra problem wrong.

          • Matt Lewis

            This is how I worked it out based on the question.

            54 apples divided by 9 trays will get six apples per tray. Divide 6 apples per tray by 3 classes you get two apples per tray. 9 trays with 2 apples each is 18 total.

            I didn’t complete it earlier which was my bad. I thought I did.

          • rickg62

            Guess you’d better go back to third grade Matt. There are only 9 trays total, not 9 per class. Your answer of 2 per tray only results in 18 apples. The obvious answer is in the first line but the rest of it, regarding the trays, is merely a round about way of saying that there are an equal number of students in each class.
            (The correct answer is 6 per tray and 18 for each class.)

          • Jim Rasmussen

            The problem is that if “2 apples per tray, per class” were a true statement, there would have to have been 9 trays for each class. The problem says there are just nine trays, period. If you answered “a”, you’re wrong. You divide the 54 apples among the nine trays and get 6 per tray. Each class takes three of those trays and so each class gets 6 times 3 or 18 apples.

          • Matt Lewis

            You are right I didn’t complete my answer. 2 per tray per class for a total of 18 apples per class. It is a pretty simple questions, then again if I was a third grader maybe not lol

          • rickg62

            You’re still wrong. There are 6 apples per tray and 3 trays per class hence 18 apples. There are only 9 trays total, not 9 per class.

          • Matt Lewis

            “If each of the 3 classes received the same number of trays”

            As I read that. If there are nine trays and each class gets the same number of trays…I guess you are better at math than reading.

          • rickg62

            I guess I’m better at both reading and math. If there are 18 apples for each class and, as you claim, 2 per tray they would be 9 trays for each class, thus 27 trays total.The problem clearly states that there are 9 trays divided equally among the three classes, thus 3 trays per class, 6 apples per tray for 18 total per class.

          • Matt Lewis

            Whats funny is we are arguing over a part of the question that doesn’t matter as the end result is the same.

          • rickg62

            The middle part involving the tray could be dispensed with by saying there are an equal number of students in each class. Wording it this way, however, does allow for a student to work the problem in two different ways. The first we know, 54/3=18. the second way would be to divide 54 apples by 9 trays or 6 per tray. Then if each of three classes get an equal number of trays, that 9 divided by 3 or 3 trays of 6 apple each per class. Thus 3 times 6 equals the same answer of 18. This allows the student to do the math showing an equal number of students in each class and to have had two calculations revealing the same answer.
            Third grade was 56 years so I’m not sure but I suspect that this involved a word problem might be a stretch, not for the math involved, but for the complexity of the concepts.

          • Scott Prinn

            no,the question asked how many apples per class

      • Xavier Martinez

        Well, this actually shows how dumbed down students have become. They (the students) may not have a clue what the answer may be, but I bet they know EVERYTHING about their favorite WWE wrestler; also, as these dumbed-down students get older (& get passed along to higher grades), they learn more about reality stars, crappers (the “c” is silent), & drugs than they do about basic math, reading, writing. Is it all the curriculum’s fault??? I believe parents are a major factor in this catastrophic educational failure.

        • yolds

          Xavier, spot on!! I was highly involved at school throughout my children’s education and the common theme I heard from the teachers was “why is it that the kids that are doing great, it’s their parents I see and not the ones doing poorly” which of course was answered by, “Because we are here is the reason our kids are doing well” However that being said, I had to fight, poke and prod 1/2 of the teachers because they couldn’t take the time to notify me if my child was falling behind. Public Unions are a huge drain on the schools and offer protection for the teachers that should not be teachers

      • http://www.conservativefiction.com/blog/author-pages/ Jamie Wilson

        Which means they’re not testing math skills on that test. Kids have to have both math and verbal to do well on questions like that – which would be okay except the test is supposed to be math. Mixing this kind of confusion in confounds your results and unnecessarily discourages kids who haven’t developed their verbal skills as quickly as their math skills.

    • Republicanvet

      For third graders?

      • http://www.black-and-right.com/ IceColdTroll

        What he said ^

      • Todd St John

        Pretty rigorous for 3rd graders, yes. You have to put very hard questions by grade level. This is pretty hard for a 3rd grader, but it is definitely an elementary level question.

        20 years ago this would have been a HS question. Hopefully people will see that Public Schools are much more rigorous than they were in past years, but that would not fit the meme they want to portray.

        • Steven H

          I did problems like this in elementary school. By high school (20 years ago) I was doing algebra and geometry.

        • logicool

          Pretty rigorous for a sixth grader, actually. The problem involves some trickery. I support the advancement of our educational system but we cannot skip steps. There’s no way a third grader is ready for a question of this magnitude.

        • rickg62

          And it would still be a high school question today. You have to go back to the early to mid 60’s to find the last rigorous schooling and that still wasn’t as hard as some at the turn of the 20th century.
          Read Thomas Sowell’s book “Inside American Education”. It was written twenty years ago and is still accurate today.

        • NB_Liberallies

          Well, I have to disagree with this statement Todd.

          My son started school by attending a private school. Because of money, we eventually moved him in third grade to a public school. Both, the public school and the private school are considered top schools in the area and we live in a very nice suburb of Chicago. However, what my son was doing and “learning” in third grade at the public school was what he had already learned during first and second grade in the private school.

          This is not a meme, but what countless of parents who go from a private school to a public school constantly find.

          This is what I have seen happen to my sibling’s kids. My brother had his kids in a public school, again considered very good. When he switched and placed them in the private high school, his kids were light years behind. In Freshman year of high school, they were learning what public schools teach in Junior year.

          Public schools, regardless of neighborhood, tend to be weak compared to their private school competitors. But we all know, public school teachers, teacher’s union hate competition. why? Because if education was decided via the economic market, public schools, public school teachers, teacher’s union would cease to exist.

          I am unsure why public school teachers, administrators refuse, just completely refuse to follow private school curriculum and standards. Our education would be so much better.

          • Todd St John

            I guess I have have taught in great schools. Most of the kids we get from Private School and especially Home School are way behind us.

          • TexSizzle

            I suspect it has to do, at least in part, to teaching to the lowest level in class. I was always among the most intelligent in my classes, and bored still most of the time because it took so long for the slowest in the class to pick up what came easily to me.

            One school I attended divided students according to ability, and I did much better there because I was challenged. I heard that they did away with the tracking system a few years later because it wasn’t “fair” to the slower students.

    • Janice LEE

      Your reading skills are not exactly up to par. You taught HS math. This question was posed on a test for THIRD graders. Kapiche?

    • peggypie

      this was THIRD GRADE!!!!!

    • Rambling Mother

      problem is they don’t teach that type of division in 3rd grade not to mention all the extra information put in the question.

      If the grades drop the teachers get fired. If the teachers can’t teach this to 3rd graders so they will understand who will? Parents should if they can, but all can’t. That question even confused me on initial first reading, and I can do math.

      Of course given time a child could figure it out so how much time is given on a common core standardized test? I doubt enough to figure it out.

    • frgough

      That isn’t a rigorous problem, it’s a poorly-worded problem. The number of trays is put in the question as if it were important, but is actually redundant information. Word problems are designed to get you to take real-world situations, distill them down to a mathematical basis and provide an answer.

      It’s also a stupid scenario, but does point out the social engineering in Common Core. Note that the apples aren’t divvy’d up by individuals, but by class. When I was a kid, the word problem would have been something like this:

      The school has 54 Apples and 162 students. How many slices must each apple be cut into so that every child gets a piece of an Apple?

      • Kim

        Again…Not for a 3rd grade student!

        • NB_Liberallies

          yes for a third grade student. We must demand so much more from our children.

          yes, ask this type of questions and harder from our third grade teachers. Give our children quality teachers who can teach our children to answer this type of question in 3rd grade.

          Common core is garbage for many reasons, but this problem is not one of them and neither is it how frgough presented it.

    • melmc13

      Okay, you teach high school. This is a third grade question. In the early grades, the goal should be to determine how well the students know the content, not whether or not they can figure out the tricks on the test. The younger students haven’t usually developed that capability yet, so testing in that way is preposterous, as it tells you next to nothing. If they get it wrong, does it mean they missed the trick or that they couldn’t do the math? You don’t know when you ask a question in that manner to a child who is not yet ready for the ‘trick questions.”

    • Frustrated Teacher

      This question turns a math test into both a reading comprehension activity AND a logic test. I really don’t see how this question judges a student’s math ability any better than solving 54/9*3. I see the same thing with science exams (I have taught science for 15 years). Three step reasoning is an admirable quality, but not every child (or adult) is successful at it, nor should they be expected to be. They do the same thing and turn what should be a science test into a reading comprehension/logic test. It is one thing to be able to teach math or science concepts in a 50 minutes class but a whole other level to try and teach the kind of intellect for these types of tests.

      • Matt Lewis

        I believe you are confusing intellect with common sense. I am not a common core advocate as I admit I don’t know much about it but the sample questions provided is very basic as long as you follow the instructions. A persons natural reaction is to divide the apples by trays and walk away at an answer of 6, but of course that would be wrong if you didn’t read the rest of the question. That’s why questions like these are good because they force you to pay attention. As in life. The people I have worked with suck at their job because questions like this are way above their comprehension.

        • muscleshop

          Considering you posted the wrong answer, this groups you with your sucky counterparts.

        • Ronald Green

          Still we’re dealing with 3rd Graders on a question that you got wrong, tell you anything?

    • Jim Rasmussen

      “That said there is absolutely nothing wrong with that question.” Does that include the belief by some commenters that it’s age inappropriate? I’m a former math teacher and I had to read it more than once to slog through the red herrings. I can’t imagine a 3rd grader making sense of it.

    • Ronald Green

      It was for 3rd Graders dude. They’re just getting basic multiplication and division down. You’re expecting them to master complex problem solving at 7 or 8? Gifted students, okay… the average kid…, the test scores speak for themselves

    • NB_Liberallies

      There are very legitimate reasons not to adopt common core, but this type of math problem is definitely not one of them.

      Reasoning through a wordy problem like like the example shown above is a great thing.

      It looks like public education has done a lot more harm, including among my conservative peers, than it has been previously stated!

      A few years back, while my parents were cleaning their garage, they found a 1950s 8th grade public school civics exam. I am a political science major, love politics, government, etc, etc. The questions asked by this exam are questions that are asked today during a college final!!!

      Sorry, public school education, is pure, pure garbage and compared to today’s private schools and decades back public schools, today’s public school are “dumbed down”.

    • Kathy

      Hello?! Anybody home? You are a HIGH SCHOOL MATH TEACHER…this is a THIRD GRADE “PROBLEM”…can’t they learn the BASICS before you ask them to solve a problem beyond their cognitive development? This is like giving them a tinker toy set (not an erector set – that would be too logicl) and asking them to make the Eiffel Tower!

    • Rudy

      Very well stated……

    • jaimo

      Well, they in Texas did adopt it, but when Rick Perry found out what it was all about, it is now being filtered back out. It’s not the testing, but it’s the tracking of the kids throughout their education so that the government will know which field of work they should go into and which opportunities will be afforded them based on their strengths. I don’t like government telling any kid that because they are weaker in an area that they aren’t “allowed” to pursue it . All that “for the common good” sh*t isn’t for me.

      You can thank Glenn Beck for bringing this issue to everyone’s attention.

  • GoSellCrazySomeplaceElse

    There is one POTUS and 47% of citizens on government assistance; how many ass wipes voted for this clown? #CommonSore

  • Guest

    Okay, I did this in my head, and I never got above an A- on ANY math assignment on my own.

    • Chase C.

      Are you in 3rd grade? If you are CONGRATS

      • Lady 12

        This is BASIC MULTIPLICATION! Perfect for regular third graders.

        • Chase C.

          Really? Because I solved the question with division.

          • Lady 12

            My mistake. It is division.

            This is still not brutal math.

          • Chase C.

            Maybe I was just a dumb 3rd grader. But seem a little difficult of a question from my point of view for a 3rd grader.

          • Frank Drebin

            Solve with division, recheck with multiplication.

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bfq5kju627c

          • rickg62

            Unfortunately that’s not always being taught. Our grandson is going into 6th grade and until this past year hadn’t learned that concept until I showed him.

          • logicool

            your mistake indeed! Not only is it not multiplication, it’s also not at all by any stretch of the word “basic”. If you cannot solve it, that’s a problem. But solving this question as a third grader makes the third grader very unique; not “basic” or average. I would gander that this was solved correctly by lesser than 10% of third graders.

            Rephrasing the question as, “There are 54 apples which will be divided up equally and given to 3 classes. How many apples will each class get?” would make this more basic.

          • aztectrumpet

            You could use multiplication too if you start by dividing 54 by 9(which is easier for third graders than dividing 54 by 3 because of the rule when dividing by 9)

          • Lady 12

            True. My point is that, while Common Core is a terrible system, this particular problem should be well within the range of third grade. It could have been worded better, but the math is still the same.

          • Ronald Green

            And how old are you? 7 or 8? I didn’t think so.

          • Cyborg3K

            54 x 1/3 = 18. . . Multiplication

          • logicool

            Probably not for a third grader.

          • ChiTownGal

            They don’t teach fractions in 3rd grade.

          • GaryTheBrave

            54�3=18 . . . Division.

          • Catchance

            It’s actually both. Divide 54 by 9 = 6 apples per tray. 6 x 3 trays= 18.

          • thetreyman

            no. i got it with eliminating the BS.

            “54 apples set aside as a snack for 3 classes”

            “how many apples did each class get”

            54/3=18

            just goes to show, you always take C.

            not to mention that 18 is the number of students the teachers union wants for each teacher so there will be more teachers and more money for the union.

          • Catchance

            Very good! I tediously went through the whole thing… but then, I’m ‘old and rusty’.

            Wonder if third graders will get it?

          • Kim

            That’s how I did it too Catchance.

          • aztectrumpet

            It may take more steps, but for third graders, solving it in the way the problem sets it up may be easier.

            But they should have said 9 trays before they talked about the 3 classes. Going back and forth like that is what confuses people.

          • rickg62

            Logically that’s the right answer if you knew that each class had the same number of students. The garbage with the trays is just a drawn out way of saying that.

          • thetreyman

            no. i got it with eliminating the BS.

            “54 apples set aside as a snack for 3 classes”

            “how many apples did each class get”

            54/3=18

            just goes to show, you always take C.

            not to mention that 18 is the number of students the teachers union wants for each teacher so there will be more teachers and more money for the union.

  • ObamaFail

    Are liberals proud of this? Virtually everything they’ve touched since Obama was elected in 2008 has turned to crap. Who would have thought that kids would get a lot dumber under the Obama agenda. Although, I’m guessing that’s what the Democrats want. More kids becoming idiots means they grow up to be Democrat voters.

  • Chase C.

    Most people posting in this totally missed the point. I’m glad a grown adult can get the answer to a question meant for 3rd graders.

    • The Penguin

      So please then…what’s the point? possibly without a snotty comment at the end this time?

      • Chase C.

        Long story short. Common Core is ridiculous.

    • ObamaFail

      Except thanks to Common Core, the third graders are failing to actually answer questions meant for their age group.

      • Guest

        ^ What he said.

        • The Penguin

          I agree, and many here have echoed this…why the insults? You seem conservative in some of your other comments regarding other topics, but here you’re just coming off like a troll. And don’t talk like I, or anyone one else here is beneath you…savvy douche?

          • Chase C.

            I didn’t get why people were bragging about being able to answer a question that was meant for 3rd graders. That’s all I was trying to say.

    • Chase C.

      Down votes don’t discourage me.

    • Markward

      Here is my take on this test. Its is the wrong test for that grade level. You want more direct questions like “54 divided by 6 =” as in this level you are still developing the fundamentals of math. That question, if it can confuse an adult by wording, just think what it do to a younger child.

      • Chase C.

        I’m still not getting why I’m being down voted.

        • plumberskid

          Because for some folks on this board, just like for the third graders who had to answer this question, reading comprehension is a problem.

          • The Penguin

            No…It’s pretty much you and Chase that are the problem. “Nothing personal” though…

        • plumberskid

          Because for some folks on this board, just like for the third graders who had to answer this question, reading comprehension is a problem.

        • thetreyman

          why do you care?

          • Chase C.

            And yet you care enough to ask me why I care.

          • thetreyman

            What? That makes no sense. I never said anything about me caring or not. I asked why you care. Or are you saying you care because someone else cares to ask you a question? Well that sounds stupid too.

        • thetreyman

          why do you care?

        • Guest
        • The Penguin

          I’ll take “reasons my point falls on deaf ears when presented in an arrogant, condescending, and douchey manner” Alex for 200. And drop the why doesn’t anyone like me bs. Grow up, learn some manners, and come back.

          • Chase C.

            HAHA do you not see the hypocrisy in your comments? I’m honest about who I am and how I handle stupidity. Are you?

          • The Penguin

            Ignorance of something doesn’t mean someone is “stupid”. Nor does it make them open season for insults. This is an immature Leftist tactic.You drew first blood when you were insulting. Just because you are “honest” about your being an a$$hole doesn’t condone the fact that you are. Capice?

          • Chase C.

            You attack me for insulting others for insulting others. I’m going to stop at that. Keep hiding behind a fake avatar.

          • The Penguin

            I like the “black and white of it”. Are you calling me out or something there Chasey?

          • The Penguin

            Oh and…LOL ha ha ha…child. F*ckn pffft.

  • Emily B

    I think that question is terribly confusing! Why all the extra info? I don’t even think my kids could’ve easily worked that out as third graders (and they did not go to public school!). Way overcomplicated. I can barely wrap my head around it! And I can’t even buy that “Math is Hard” shirt from Children’s Place because they pulled it off the shelves. Darn.

  • FreedomFighter

    Why the F would you put slices of apples on 9 trays for 3 classes???

    • Republicanvet

      Moochie’s Lets Move schtick. By the way, given how Moochie and Preezy Roofhits have been spending over the past 5 years, perhaps they should be teaching about trillions of apples.

  • DLago

    I see what they are doing. The question is more about extracting important information from the noise than math. Very important skill to pick up, and very dangerous if kids learn it applies to more than math problems.

  • John

    “There were 54 apples set aside as a snack for 3 classes of students. The
    teachers divided up the apples and placed equal amounts on 9 separate
    trays. If each of the 3 classes received the same number of trays, how
    many apples did each class get?”

    WTF? Is this a math test or a reading comprehension exam? This is beyond stupid: third-graders are supposed to be learning mathematics fundamentals, but how on Earth are they supposed to do that with tests like this?

    Before some leftist troll accuses me of being an uneducated hick, let me point out that I have Masters’ (yes, plural) in Physics and Engineering Science.

    I reiterate: this is several shades past stupid.

    • Markward

      When the STEM people begin to call out this test, its time to think.

      Oh, and I am an Electronics Engineer.

    • Eddie

      Has it occurred to anyone that this might be one of the harder questions? Tough to tell without seeing the entire test. Also the WHOLE POINT is to integrate reading comprehension…. the fact that kids failed does not make the test bad it means we need to a better job teaching them…. as a high school teacher the kids I get can’t write or think when they leave middle school… maybe this will help the teachers in elementary and middle school send me some kids who can actually write a coherent sentence and have an original thought

    • ChiTownGal

      I have never had a problem solving math problems using the ‘old fashion arithmetic’ from a bygone era. In the ’70’s, when my son was in 2nd grade, they started using a new math curriculum called ‘New Math’. That lasted all of about 3 years & that was gone. Went back to basic math.

      If you keep kids confused, they can’t advance, therefore, ‘dumbing down of America’.

  • Voice of reason

    “The new Common Core curriculum will empower students to achieve at higher levels in the years ahead” But for now your screwed!

  • Markward

    WTF kind of word problem was that, too much useless information to say: they were 54 apples and three classes, how many did each class get?

    • Chase C.

      Finally reason comes into the conversation

      • The Penguin

        Well hell…let’s pack up and close the discussion. “Chase” finally got his affirmation.

        • Chase C.

          Sorry if my comments were too hard for you to comprehend. Do I need to dumb them down to a 3rd grade level?

          • thetreyman

            no, but you do seem needy.

          • Chase C.

            Needy? Nope never asked for anything from the government. Have you?

          • The Penguin

            Ha! You are the poster child of the left’s proposed up and coming majority. Mine is the only opinion that maters, anyone older is stupid, and anyone that disagrees with me is dumb.

          • thetreyman

            emotionally needy.

          • thetreyman

            no, but you do seem needy.

          • The Penguin

            Nice one…It took you a whole hour to think of a comeback and that was the best you could do? Your point was valid to most, some didn’t agree, that’s okay too. The arrogance in which you presented it was the problem.

          • Homeschool

            ….too hard…
            Hard means not soft.
            Difficult means not easy.

            Choose your words wisely, or you will be considered dumbed down.

          • TexSizzle

            “Hard” comes from Old English and had more than one meaning. “Difficult” came from Norman French and is much more narrow in scope. Do you think that makes it better somehow?

          • Chase C.

            4 periods before saying something and 3 periods after it means what? Don’t insult me for using a word that is commonly used to describe difficult, when you can’t can’t take your finger of the …………………. button.

    • Eddie

      because we are looking for actual thinking and not just the dummy answer?

  • Republicanvet

    Is BloominIdiot cheering because he knows a new crop of easily nannied sheep are being created?

  • Jack Deth

    How is question going to be re-phrased for inner city children?

    Most third graders will spend more time deciphering the problem, get frustrated and decide to screw the answer.

    • Catchance

      Question phrased for inner-city children:
      You have 18 apples in your class and 36 students. How many students will you have to carve up with your switchblade so that you can have 3?

  • nc

    Best advice I ever got from a college algebra teacher regarding word problems: “Answer the question.” He said you would be surprised how many people got wrong answers because they answered the wrong question.

    • stuckinIL4now

      Yes but if it’s a math problem, why is there an extraneous question in it? Stick to the math–it’s not a critical thinking class, it’s freakin’ math.

      • Eddie

        LIFE is about critical thinking…. school is supposed to prepare students for the future…. you sound like my students who while when I grade for grammar on a history test “why should grammar count this is not english class”

        • Ronald Green

          At 7 or 8 years old you expect ‘critical thinking’? They’re struggling with 7 X 6 for the most part. In Junior High and High School is where ‘critical thinking’ is supposed to be introduced, not elementary school. It’s called “Elementary School” for a reason.

    • stuckinIL4now

      Yes but if it’s a math problem, why is there an extraneous question in it? Stick to the math–it’s not a critical thinking class, it’s freakin’ math.

  • http://www.freedomreconnection.com CO2 Producer

    Question 4 (page 5) on that test is confusing.

    “Give a fraction that represents each point on the string compared to the whole.”

    They mark three points on the drawing of a string and call them “Point A,” Point B,” and “Point C,” all spaced a quarter of the total length apart.

    The reason this is confusing is because you could cut at Point A or Point C and have two pieces of string left over—1/4 of the whole and 3/4 of the whole. They don’t specify which direction to start from, left or right. For Point A and Point C, there could be two different answers.

    I get the point of “visualizing” for practical purposes, but good grief, there’s got to be a better way of doing it…such as putting five points on the string—Points A through E (A and E at each end), then asking what the fraction between Points A and B, C, or D are in relation to the string as a whole.

    And Question 5 poses a dumb scenario:

    A third grade class decided to sell boxes of cookies to help raise money for a school trip. Each box has two bags of cookies inside, and each bag holds 14 cookies. If each student needed to sell 4 boxes of cookies, how many cookies did each student need to sell?

    Who cares how many cookies there are? The cookies are inside the boxes. They need to sell the boxes. They don’t have to worry about how many cookies they need to sell. There is no cookie quota. There’s a box quota.

    Just…dumb.

    Question 7:

    There are 3 large picture frames. Each picture frame contains exactly 2 pictures. What fraction represents just one picture out of all the pictures in the frames?

    “Exactly” 2? Are you sure? And “just” one “out of all the” TWO “in the frames”? Oh, right, you meant to ask, “What fraction represents one picture out of all the pictures in ALL the frames.”

    Who writes this garbage? I’ll say this: it does reflect the kind of convoluted half-questions they’ll be asked when they get older. Maybe Common Core is about teaching kids how to read simple minds.

    • Republicanvet

      Who writes this garbage? People who have no intention of properly teaching kids.

      As for question 5…sounds like a question teaching a drug dealer how to increase profits. If each box cost $500 and you break down the boxes, cut the packages with some Oreo’s, then sell the cut packages, what percentage increase in profits would there be? Less Keebler’s cut of course.

      Besides, given Moochie’s unilaterally deciding what kids should eat, which ones know what cookies are anyway? They should use carrot sticks.

      • http://www.freedomreconnection.com CO2 Producer

        Less Keebler’s cut of course.

        Now we’re talking fifth grade-level stuff.

      • TexSizzle

        And why is Keebler getting a cut for Nabisco cookies?

        • Ronald Green

          Cause da Keebler elves says so dat’s why.

    • TexSizzle

      Taking Question 4 literally as stated, “each point of the string compared to the whole” is 1/∞.

      • http://www.freedomreconnection.com CO2 Producer

        If it makes a difference, I transcribed that question, not copied. It should read “on the string” instead of “of the string.” Correcting it now.

        Addendum: no, it probably doesn’t make a difference. Still a poorly executed query.

  • MNWoman

    I didn’t even start learning how to do division until 3rd grade, and even then it was very basic.

    I should have remembered my teachers telling me to read through the entire question before answering. I eventually got this right, but I spent too much time going through the first few steps, figuring out how many apples were on each tray. If I would have just read through the entire question first I would have realized the trays are irrelevant. But I am an adult who has had many years of schooling, learning math and comprehension skills. As a thrid grader, I am sure I would have been wondering where the trays fit in.

    I will say I hope teachers are still requiring students to learn math skills without calculator.

    • Jay Stevens

      Me, too. But I doubt it. And I am seeing the result at work. Most of my Saudi coworkers cannot add three numbers without a calculator. And they are supposed to be electronics technicians.

  • praymorenow1

    But, the Bush No Child Left Behind testing standards were too hard……?
    Come on….the math part is probably the least objectionable……..sad to say…and the social studies, history, English, etc., are probably outrageously left wing propaganda….
    The only reason Bloomberg cheers this – is because the teacher union supported this.
    I’m sure somewhere along the line, Bloomy has a financial tie to this in software, etc.
    Nothing wrong w/ a testing standard. The rest of the world adheres to standard tests. The difference is we should not eliminate opportunities for children who may not test well initially. Nor should we presume every kid must go to a BA or BS college program.
    Let’s encourage kids to also consider a trade school: have you seen what a plumber or electrician makes today? Please, it rivals what a BA in English or Pol. Sci will get you.
    Bloomy….get back to the Big Gulp ban…………

    • TexSizzle

      It’s considerably more than a BA in POSC will get you. I know from experience.

    • GeauxGod

      In either C-Scope or Common Core, or perhaps both, in history they are saying the Boston Tea Party was a terrorist act. And that 9/11… the men who flew their planes into the Twin Towers are Freedom Fighters.

    • Marvin Nelson

      One basic premise of teaching is that different children learn different ways. Trying to teach all of them the same materials using the same methods guarantees the you hit the “average” kids and ignore the special needs kids, which includes gifted.

  • The Masked Avatar

    I’m fascinated with the fact that it’s called Common Core and they’re referring to apples. I’m totally fascinated. Look at me. I’m fascinated.

  • Educator

    Being a teacher myself, and having to teach this type of conceptual understanding even in 2nd grade, what was missing was the teaching of 3 dimensional understand which you not get from a computer. Children will not learn this on an app or their ipad or iphone but actually interacting with real objects. When using computers they are only good for gathering of information, a child’s response by clicking a mouse, this is not real life. Sorry Mr. Gates but children really need to have realia to create a deep impression for mental growth.

  • radicallyalyssa

    I agree that tests should be more difficult, but not like THAT for a frickin’ third grader. Jeez

  • radicallyalyssa

    I agree that tests should be more difficult, but not like THAT for a frickin’ third grader. Jeez

  • $17227379

    Difficult tests are needed, unless we enjoy falling behind the rest of the world.

    • thetreyman

      the rest of the world doesnt use this. that is why the people promoting it will say it’s “internationally reviewed” not “internationally adopted.” it may have been “reviewed” but then it was rejected.

    • thetreyman

      the rest of the world doesnt use this. that is why the people promoting it will say it’s “internationally reviewed” not “internationally adopted.” it may have been “reviewed” but then it was rejected.

    • John Thomas “Jack” Ward III

      Bring back Math Drills, Multiplication Tables, and (especially) “SCHOOLHOUSE ROCK” Vignettes! Approved by hard-ass Math teachers like Macswiggin (sic), Nolan and Necessary. Jawamax 8<{D}

    • Markward

      Dude, we were already falling behind. This isn’t the solution, nor is throwing money at it going to fix it. Something different is needed, I mean look at magnet and charter schools and how well they perform when compared to public schools. The answer is giving parents freedom to choose the school they want to put their children in, or even homeschool.

      • Marvin Nelson

        We spend more per student than any other country and have nothing to show for it. The money spent for education goes to administrator salaries, testing materials, supplementary materials, etc. Little if any of it actually has a direct impact on teaching and learning.

    • Marvin Nelson

      Another news flash: We are behind and have been there for years. If you want to see the data, go to the TIMSS site at

      http://nces.ed.gov/timss/results11.asp

  • $17227379

    Difficult tests are needed, unless we enjoy falling behind the rest of the world.

  • chris hasty

    i don’t understand why people think that math question should not be given to third graders. it’s a word problem. give those third graders those kind of problems now and when they get to fourth grade they will be better at it. quit bitching about standards and about how we don’t promote math as a skill. pick on or the other but don’t bitch about both. math is not hard it just requires practice. these third graders are getting what they need. word problems are supposed to be that way.get over it people.

  • chris hasty

    i don’t understand why people think that math question should not be given to third graders. it’s a word problem. give those third graders those kind of problems now and when they get to fourth grade they will be better at it. quit bitching about standards and about how we don’t promote math as a skill. pick on or the other but don’t bitch about both. math is not hard it just requires practice. these third graders are getting what they need. word problems are supposed to be that way.get over it people.

  • NixTyranny

    The way we’re headed, in a few years the same question will probably say, “President Obama divided up the apples … If each of the 3 classes received the same number of trays from President Obama, how many apples did President Obama let each class have?”

  • NixTyranny

    The way we’re headed, in a few years the same question will probably say, “President Obama divided up the apples … If each of the 3 classes received the same number of trays from President Obama, how many apples did President Obama let each class have?”

  • stuckinIL4now

    I recall seeing a question in my 8yo nephew’s math book that asked about something I believe an 8yo would have little or no concept of. They need to focus on the math and not confuse kids with extraneous info or trick questions that don’t help to solve the MATH problem.

  • stuckinIL4now

    I recall seeing a question in my 8yo nephew’s math book that asked about something I believe an 8yo would have little or no concept of. They need to focus on the math and not confuse kids with extraneous info or trick questions that don’t help to solve the MATH problem.

  • Howard Schargel

    Is the answer 2? I needs to know!! #tcot

  • Stephen L. Hall

    You sure those educators aren’t the same people creating the IRS forms?

  • Magnifico

    Anybody who doesn’t not want to fail this course, raise your hand.

  • Steve_J

    How are the third grader’s supposed to know how many trays each class received?

  • bbroome62

    Keep the fucking gov’t out of school PERIOD.

  • socalcon

    Bloomberg: Our kids is dumb. Yay!

  • John Thomas “Jack” Ward III

    THis is how I learned Math (But it was way back in the early seventies) Addition, Subtraction, applying addition and subtraction, Multiplication, Division, application of those two; then, fractions, decimals, combined application of those two.ANd, before we were tested on the various applications of math (Here’s the IMPORTANT PART!), we were DRILLED On using them, so we knew them!
    And nowadays, with “Equal outcome education,” it appears that the kid who gets a hug for Answering (example:2+2=5 ) is slated to go farther than the kid who answered correctly. I think we should go back to the “Three R’s” and throw this Common Core garbage in the incinerator! Jawamax 8<{D}

    • TexasTemplar

      Because of a grassroots public outcry the Texas legislature passed a law this last session making it ILLEGAL TO USE OR TEACH FROM ANY COMMONCORE materials. As of August 1, 2013 CSCOPE/COMMONCORE books ARE ILLEGAL in the 475 Texas school districts in which they were used. Stupid New Yorkers.

    • Karl Winrich

      Pretty much the same for me in the mid 70’s. We learned the basic and then started to get into using logic to figure out word puzzles like this around 4th grade, the grade when we really started to put together how the basic functions (+ – * / ) really worked.

      Bit I do believe that a puzzle like this one at the 3rd grade level is just a bit too complicated, there’s just way too much information provided to get these youngsters to logically pick their way through to arrive at 1 equation.

    • Marvin Nelson

      You got it, Jack. Right on the money.

  • David Ruiz

    My kid is going into 3rd grade this year here in Texas and she just did this apple problem. Not the way I would have done it but she came up with 6+6+6 = 18. Now she says thinking about apples made her hungry. LoL

  • Coach Mike

    The larger issue is how many other “industrialized” country’s third graders can answer this correctly?

  • ScottieDont

    Ah, social justice through math. I can see it now:

    “423 7 Layer Dips were made by 52 women each with 17 freckles on the 2nd quarter of her left buttock. If 286,312 bacteria got into every 42nd half of each 7 Layer Dip, then how many bloodthirsty white-Hispanics does it take to murder 2300 Skittle-munching angels?”

  • peggypie

    the liberal way of teaching…it’s all about data mining and social justice. corrupting kids minds…has nothing to do with education

  • MauryGirl

    Tennessee was the first to pass race to the top and use common core. The devastation to children and families is huge. Children suffer sow self esteem while are frightened and don’t know where to turn. When charts are made and put up in the classroom showing all kids in the class who is below basic and who is proficient, the teachers know (and sometimes tell) which students need to just be left behind and which ones they need to concentrate on. If teacher pay is connected to test scores, teachers know they must focus not on the high achievers, but a little on the proficient, while those who are basic get the most attention, and those below basic are ones they can’t waste their time on. There are no gold stars here. This is an awful situation. In 5th grade common core jumped my son’s entire class’ requirements for math 3 years with no instruction or plan to make up the years of missed work. Kids went from making “A” grades to failing all standardized testing. They were making “A” in class work (using the old textbooks because who could afford to get new ones teaching to the new standards) but failing all standardized tests. Suddenly the classwork didn’t matter any more. The only thing that mattered was the test. The first of the year test for baseline, the discovery testing during the year to see where they stood, and the end of the year test. One high school teacher told me this year that he has to give 16 standardized tests which takes time out of the classroom before the test and during the test. This takes at least 32 days of instruction out of his class.

  • logicool

    I’m a 32-year-old who has a doctorate degree; I consider mathematics and science as my favorite subjects. I do not understand how a third-grader could arrive at the answer correctly. They’d have to learn division in the first grade and how to apply it to overly-confusing scenarios in the second grade just to answer that garbage. This is all correct UNLESS the government is trying to prepare children for Obamacare — that will take 12 years of learning how to sort through confusing questions in order to “master”

    • ScottieDont

      You’re on the right track. These questions are designed to confuse and frustrate kids so much, that they give up and run crying to their government superiors for “translation”. Then they’ve GOT THEM.

      • frgough

        Never ascribe to conspiracy what can be explained by incompetence. The real answer here is that the so-called experts who wrote Common Core are just tremendously stupid people. LIke Nancy Pelosi stupid.

        • ScottieDont

          This is one of those really weird situations where incompetence leads to conspiracy. Like, “Oh no! I herped and fell and put this radioactive tracer in the milk supply!!”. It’s a perfect storm of stupidity and evil intent.

  • Carmen Brown

    What difference does it make. The government will take all the apples and give them to a school that doesn’t have any apples.

  • starlock

    My sons when in elementary were taught so call new math not figure.which they could out. They were failing. They were crying and upset. When I looked at it I could not figure it out. But once I figured out what the result was they were looking for I taught my sons the old ways and they got “A”‘s again. We need to go back to the standard old ways of doing math for our children.

  • Larry Bishop

    It is communism to think we all can be forced and molded into identical worker bees. Get the federal government out of education and return the power to the states and localities that actually have the schools and students. Fuck our goverment.

  • Michael Alan Cavalier

    While I’m not excited about the amount of influence the Federal government has in education today this is a step the right direction. I work in public education. I’ve talked to several exchange students from Europe and they all LAUGH at how easy our high school level math and science is compared to what they take in Europe.

    • frgough

      Right. Because europeans are such excellent critical thinkers and so brilliant at mathematics. Which is why they are voting themselves into bankruptcy.

      • Michael Alan Cavalier

        well, they sure are out-testing us…and Germany has a stronger industrial and science sector than the US.

    • Marvin Nelson

      Sorry, I have to disagree with you. Common Core is, at best, a step sideways and more likely a step backward. The Imperial Federal Government needs to get the hell out of education so that people with expertise can try to fix this mess.

      • Michael Alan Cavalier

        Marvin…I actually agree but until that happens CC is better than what we have now.

  • Aaron Smith

    That was not a terrible question. It is deductive formulating mathematical sentencing. however, the problem with education system is far from Common Chore. However, Common Chore is terrible. For years most students have been a part of dumb down education system. where we should be pushing students to higher expectation and academic standards. The uses of block learning of transition learning. (e.i. k-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-10, and 11-12) Change the learning environment, the way we teach, and the test we use. That way students that can move forward quickly are not held back for kids that need more time. For those that need more time they can have it. State Standardize testing will not improve student scores, if we continue to teach to a test and allow a destructive education system to demoralize our students.

  • kbielefe

    If you think being able to calculate 54 / 9 * 3 is the most important skill here, you’re sadly mistaken. In the real world, problems aren’t given to you in numerical form with all extraneous information removed. In the real world, electronic calculators are ubiquitous. It’s utterly useless to know how to divide if you don’t know what to divide.

    Yes, being able to do arithmetic on paper or in your head is a useful skill, but I know way too many adults who know their multiplication tables perfectly but can never figure out the right way to use them. If I had to choose, I’d prefer my child know how to solve the problem and not know how to do the math rather than the other way around.

    • Marvin Nelson

      Unfortunately, the math gets in the way of problem solving here. The math used in the problem should facilitate solving the problem, not muck it up.

  • Cappy Paxton

    Being able to pick out relevant information is vital to understand and correctly responding to many of life’s situations. Maybe that is why so many folks cannot objectively look at the information they receive. I’d say the Trayvon/Zimmerman issue is a prime example. Instead of looking at the facts and omitting those that were not relevant, so many were unable to logically come to a conclusion; instead it became a popularity contest/reality TV (contradiction in terms) thing … with our nation becoming the loser.

    • Ronald Green

      We’re still talking about 3rd graders here that’s 7 & 8 year olds.

      • Chase C.

        It’s funny how some of the people can’t comprehend that the fu**ing question was meant for 3rd graders and not ADULTS.

        • Ronald Green

          I agree, but tone it down a bit, dude.

          • Chase C.

            Not going to happen. I am who I am. Some people hate me and most people dislike me. Not a big deal.

          • Ronald Green

            I don’t care about any of that, however, if you want to influence people and have your opinion respected, the old honey and vinegar thing applies. You get more with honey than you do with vinegar. From flies to ideas, it works.

        • Zach Smith

          There are plenty of 3rd graders who could easily solve this simple problem. Not all, of course, but isn’t the purpose of testing to determine that?

      • Cappy Paxton

        noted – maybe I was slipping in a notion at too young an age. I’ll stand by that notion but not apply it to ones so young.
        ps KMA Chase – being an asshat is one thing, being proud of it is another dealeo entirely. Like ignorance; it is nothing to be ashamed of, being proud of it is a sorry condition at its best. Self respecting individuals try to improve themselves.

      • http://bookwi.se/ Adam Shields

        You have to be 5 by Sept 1 to start Kindergarten (dates are different, but mostly that is the case in most areas of the country), so there are going to be a few 8 year olds but mostly 9 year olds when they are taking this test. A small difference, but it is a difference.

  • GaryTheBrave

    The question was perfect. It’ll help the kids when they are filling out their tax returns.

  • descolada9

    The damage we continue to do to our children and their future places me on the verge of tears. I simply hope and pray that the freaks who continue to degrade education aren’t actually doing it with the goal of ruining these children and their futures.

  • AlmostaCowboy

    Subtext – Everyone shares the apples equally (Marxism).

  • 24601

    It’s like a bunch of those ridiculous facebook comment trolling math problems rolled into one.

    Maybe it has some nonsense like “Name a _________ that doesn’t have_______”.

  • Jeff H

    Better end to the question: “If each of the 3 classes received the same number of trays, why? And did it have anything to do with the fact that one of the classes was full of Asian smarty-pants, while the other 2 classes were filled with African-Americans who were suffering from racist looks by all the white privileged kids who didn’t attend this public school?”

    • Ronald Green

      Oh please… It’s Raaacist. SMH.

    • Chase C.

      That’s pretty fu**ed up.

      • Jeff H

        Yes, racially-based (read: racist) testing is, indeed, f’d up.

  • Walknot

    Story problems are a whole different monster and kids need to learn how to manage a question like that. In the third grade, they have not mastered that skill. In fact, many of them have not mastered reading by that point. Combine that with a newly introduced concept of mutiplication and division and you are setting the students up for failure.

    • Marvin Nelson

      I know a lot of adults who have not “mastered” this skill.

  • http://bookwi.se/ Adam Shields

    The problem is that most people (including teachers) don’t really understand what common core in math is trying to do. Common core is trying to show multiple ways of accomplishing a problem, prior to introducing the equation. So by third grade, students should have seen at least three or four methods for solving the problem. It is more than just division. Common core is attempting to teach students why division works and why we need it.

    As an example a student from an unnamed large midwestern city moved to my wife’s school. She had memorized her multiplication times tables very well. But she had no concept of either place value or why multiplication works. But she knew her times tables. So when she was being taught division, she was completely lost. The teacher had to start at square one with basic place value.

    But one more issue is that crossing state lines should not be such a big deal in education. But with 50 different sets of standards and 50 different grade progressions of how learning builds, students that move are inevitably behind (even if they were advanced in their prior school).

    • Marvin Nelson

      News flash: Common Core is not going to fix this. Standards will be addressed differently in different states, so nothing will be any different. Common Core is a scam by the government and text book companies to continue offering mediocre education and big money for the publishers.

    • Ronald Green

      Really? And you learned multiplication and division in the 2nd Grade?

      • http://bookwi.se/ Adam Shields

        no you don’t learn times tables, you learn repeated addition. Visual ways to see place value, reasoning skills. Also this test is for the end of 3rd grade when you have been taught multiplication.

        This is the first portion of the standards for math for third grade

        represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division.

        • Understand properties of multiplication and the relationship between multiplication and division.

        • multiply and divide within 100.

        • Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain patterns in arithmetic.

        • Ronald Green

          Exactly basic math. Not reading comprehension involving complex word problems, you get into that in the 4th grade.

          And common core is trying to do more than just educate, it is also trying to indoctrinate. Which is something we don’t need.

  • Rick0418

    This question is more reading comprehension than math. Couple issues:
    1. Is this a typical question or one of the few to differentiate between the average student and the very bright?
    2. Are the current tests over emphasizing reading over math? Some time ago, it was realized that boys are better at arithmetic and girls better at reading. So, are tests now trying to give girls an extra edge in the math tests?

  • http://batman-news.com BIGJIMSELF

    It requires your kids to think. Why would you criticize that? SC Dad.

  • Cyrena

    Homeschool.

    • Karl Winrich

      congrats. A good friend of mine is home schooling her 3 children, and from what I hear they are performing at least 2 grade levels higher than public education students in the same city.

      • Cyrena

        Ours are doing amazing after only a year and we are having a great time learning alongside them.

  • Marvin Nelson

    Common Core, No Child Left Behind, the “New” math; a progression of failed programs designed to “improve” student PERFORMANCE in math, not to build knowledge. This program is a disaster and anyone who believes that this is not a government program is either naive, stupid, or liberal. (I know that I am being redundant.)

    Bloomberg obviously knows as much about math education as he does about the economy. The schools will continue to turn out kids who are basically illiterate and innumerate.

    • Karl Winrich

      And will vote Democratic for the rest of their lives because they believe that they are entitled to their welfare checks and EBT food stamp cards.

      They are going to be in for a really rude awakening when the entire country declares bankruptcy and then suddenly they find that their welfare checks aren’t worth the paper they are printed on and those plastic EBT cards don’t taste very good. But until they are able to break out of their victim mentality, in which the public school system indoctrinated them very efficiently, they are never going to be able to be more than a drain on the system, just a drone.

  • MarcusFenix

    Only Bloomburg believes that we should praise failures, like the Common Core programs. Maybe if someone just buys him a Big Gulp Pepsi and sits down to talk to him about it……

    • http://bookwi.se/ Adam Shields

      After all, we all know that it is better to just lower standards and praise those instead of trying to improve education.

      • MarcusFenix

        Absolutely correct. The US holds the current record for most money spent per child in the public school system (closely trailed by Sweeden, but still ahead), yet we’re ranked 17th overall in the world. Is it a lack of teachers who feel connected to their profession….or is it crappy curriculum that teach next to nothing? Mix of both? I’d personally lean towards the material first as being the problem…because no matter how caring or devoted a teacher may be, if they’re teaching garbage, you’ll get garbage back out.

        • Matt Lewis

          I had a math teacher who was an excellent teacher. He took the time to explain the problems and why they were what they were. I passed with a B+ after a lot of hard work and time spent with the teacher.

          My next math teacher was a coach who also taught algebra. He was the worst teacher in the world. He couldn’t do the problems himself, he just did the examples out of the book. If you asked for help you were told to get a tutor. Worst experience in my High School education…well other than the Science teacher who wouldn’t accept any papers that were not on colored paper and used flashy colored text. All of which I never say from any of the biologists I worked with in my future career.

          There are good teacher and there are just down right crappy ones.

        • Karl Winrich

          Mix of both but lets not forget about the impact of the teachers unions, they do nothing but siphon education money right off the top while giving no benefit in return for the investment.

  • Donna W

    Why are American people just sitting around, allowing this to happen???

  • Barbara

    Hey, here’s a novel idea. How about letting the teachers develop the education system. The healthcare workers can work on the healthcare system and our political leaders can just work on their own job, upholding the constitution.

  • Carmen Brown

    What difference does it make. The government will take all the apples, and redistribute to the schools without apples.

  • Bronco

    I disagree with the statement it is to “confuse students.” It’s to make the T H I N K.
    2 is *my* answer but I don’t see the correct answer.
    Trays were used in order for people to relate to real life.
    “Times tables” is now “multiplication facts.” and has been for years. It was taught in 3rd and 4th grade when I was in elementary school in 1940’s.

    I compliment anyone who is trying to improve education, teaching, and discipline. What has been done in the recent past surely isn’t working very well.

    Also parents need to be involved before children start school and not leave it all to teachers.

    • Truth

      If 2 is your answer, then you are the poster child of why this type of “education” should be banned.

  • jwmiller

    Yea that 2+2=5, New Obama Dictionary & holding one’s tongue when they hear ‘Stupid’ is a real bugger.

  • Pulmon_de_Susan

    For those who are wondering… the answer to the question above is 18. 54 apples divided by 9 trays = 6 apples per tray. If each class got an equal number of trays (9 trays divided by 3 classes), then each class got 3 trays. 3 trays times 6 apples per tray = 18 apples per classroom.

    • Truth

      Thanks but all that extra info is just crap. The correct calculation is the simplest: 54 apples divided by 3 classes = 18 apples per class. And I sucked at math. What is the point of throwing in the extra bs about trays? The question asked “how many apples did each class get”. Nothing in the question required ANY information about trays. This kind of “learning” is utter nonsense. The rule should be KISS. Keep It Simple Stupid!

      • Pulmon_de_Susan

        Yeah! Unfortunately, things are not “SIMPLE” in college. Exams are meant to be confusing, full of extra info that you don’t need, etc. I agree that the question is too advanced for 3rd graders. But a High-Schooler should be able to easily get this one right. Americans have gotten LAZY when it comes to math and science. If we are to survive as a super power, we must change.

  • Pulmon_de_Susan

    I think it is great that schools are trying to push students to THINK. But I believe that the question above is more SAT level, and not 3rd grad level. I am NOT a teacher, and I might be wrong on my former statement (since I took the SATs long ago), but I know for a fact that the question above is inappropriate for 3rd graders. My 2 cents.

  • muscleshop

    Hard to expect most parents on here to understand the simplicity of this math question for their third graders….since most of them had trouble with it themselves. That says a LOT.

  • George Hale

    It is a good question. There are adults who cannot think “by the numbers”. If they could the results of the last Presidential election would have Obama back in Hawaii today a forgotten man. Math teaches one how to think. The division of apples on trays has as much to do with taxes, health care, social security, savings, and budgeting as it does with daytime snacks for students. Remember, we are only 31st best in the world at math. It is a good question.

  • Trish Nail Laster

    When I was little they started a new way to teach English “Roberts English Series”. I don’t remember much about it but what I do remember is the look on our sixth grade teachers face when we told her we had never of diagraming sentences. I also remember that after that day they no longer taught “the Roberts English Series”! Back then teachers had a say in what they taught and how they taught! Common Core will ROB our children of learning what they need to make it in this life! How to READ! How to WRITE! How to ADD, MULTILY and DIVIDE (and get the right answer)!!!!

  • JamesHXN

    I got it. 18. But I had to draw a picture.

    • Ronald Green

      Good for you, could you have done it at 8 years old?

  • Nimble Librarian

    The important thing to look at is the fact that they mumble up unnecessary information and the student must learn to use only what is necessary. Although I don’t think this should be in a 3rd grade test, but why not push them to greater heights rather than lower test standards. Its a fantastic concept to learn.

    • Truth

      Stick to the basics. Teach students what they need to know to get the answer. Save the rest of that crap for a philosophy class or some other useless thing. It’s hard enough for kids to learn in today’s education system. Why trip them up with crap like this?

      • Nimble Librarian

        Why not challenge them now, when their minds haven’t been completely limited by others opinions of them. You cannot learn if you aren’t challenged to.

  • NB_Liberallies

    There are legitimate reasons to do away with Common Core, but the math problem presented as an example, is not one of them! My son, who is entering 4th grade, solved the problem on his first read.

    My son mastered the multiplication table during second grade. He has zero problem with long divisions, adding and subtracting come very easy for him.

    We REALLY need to ask a lot more from our children, a lot more. Parents need to get their kids off the WII, Playstation, XBox, countless of meaningless after school activities and have them concentrate in school. My son plays soccer, does great in school and by the time he entered 3rd grade, he knew his multiplication tables.

  • Classical Liberalism

    Why not take questions from the state approved curriculum for the grade to be tested? It looks like someone felt that they needed to justify a job instead of trying to test the kids on the grade level they are in. The idiot that came up with this system is probably going to either get a promotion, or a large government contract to fix what they broke.

  • Michelle Davis

    The question is needlessly confusing, but that is not because of the standard or standards (Common Core). The standard is merely what the students are expected to learn. The question was poorly designed. If you have an objection to Common Core, then by all means express it. We need to be sure what we are discussing, though. No matter what standards teachers are addressing, the questions should be examined for validity and worthiness.

  • jaimo

    Maybe the whole point of this little exercise is for the kids to fail. That way we can spend more money on teachers and stupid ideas and the government and unions will be happy. Our kids will still be idiots and will continue voting for free stuff when they grow up.

    • Truth

      You’ve got a great point there. I think you’re on to something.

  • Cantbelieveyouthinkthis

    Typical asinine over thinking BS. Hay kids, we have 54 apples divide them up evenly between 3 classes. DUH 54 / 3 = 18 per class. What a bunch of idiots, always making things twice as difficult then it needs to be.

    • $3963145

      With the way Lawyers talk and put a twist on just about everything — maybe we need to word things a little tricky so kids can figure the way to make the questions / answers simple. The lawyers aren’t going to do that cause that’s how they win and take advantage of those who can’t figure out what’s being said!!!

  • Zach Smith

    I doubt all the questions are as hard. Tests like these are designed to also determine the number of students who are more advanced. This necessarily requires a certain number of harder questions.

  • Truth

    They probably let elementary school pupils use calculators. Did you ever hand a young cashier a dollar for a 52 cent purchase, then, after they’ve entered 1.00 as cash tendered say “wait, I have 2 cents”? They just stand there in utter confusion, not knowing what to do. Today’s education system is a sham.

  • scw1000

    hmm, I have heard a little about common core, And frankly do not know enough about it especially in regards to their One world agenda which I am against! But in regards to the math problem Yes it would of been easier to ask 54 / 3 of course, but by wording it this way it makes the student concentrate more and use their mind more. I figure leases for cars, and there are multiple variables, rate, term, millage, etc.. Or trading options, or futures there are many variables before you execute a trade. So I don’t really have a problem with this math question. Overall agenda I cannot speak to as of yet.

  • Dane Gunderson

    Common Core is propaganda… the students just have to memorize the narrative