‘Small town America is the soul of our country': Sarah Palin shreds media lapdog’s ‘elitist card’

Seattle Weekly’s Ellis Conklin wrote a sneering preview of Sarah Palin’s upcoming commencement address at Republic High School in Washington state.

Conklin didn’t just belittle the former Alaska governor and what he called her “boundless anti-intellectualism”; He scoffed at the graduating class for lobbying to bring “the poor darling” to graduation.

Seems this 17-year-old kid named Tyler Weyer, the class president, has long held this fixation about Palin. So when the school year began, and fellow seniors began to ponder potential commencement speakers, Weyer, recalls principal Anderson, said, “Hey, what about Sarah Palin?’ And everyone liked the idea.”

Conklin also suggests that if Palin still had a “glimmer” of star power, she wouldn’t have to sully herself by speaking at a small school in a tiny town. Palin took to Facebook and Twitter to hit back at Conklin’s Better Than You™ contempt for small town America.

Small town America is the soul of our country, despite the opinion of the Seattle Weekly’s Ellis Conklin and the lamestream media. Todd and I are on our way to congratulate the graduating class in Republic, Washington, this Saturday and I’m honored and touched by their ingenuity, tenacity, and invitation to speak to these young Americans about to begin their futures.

Small town America is our heart; it may not be the Ivy Leagues or what Ellis and the media deem acceptable, but these students and this town represent what is good and right about America and the small towns where most of us grew our own roots and values.

Too often the media forgets its own humble roots and plays the elitist card. Not so this weekend. We are going to congratulate the Tigers of 2013 and have something special for each and every one. They will grow to defend our country, manage our economy, build our families, and work to achieve each of their own personal dreams.

Sorry, Seattle Weekly, you, as usual, miss the point.

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