You can keep your plan … if you pay way more; FSA cap cut, ‘my health insurance premium at work going up’

First, the layoff bomb due to Obamacare. Now, the avalanche of increasingly unaffordable plans, and cost increases in the form of FSA (Flexible Spending Accounts) caps.

Flexible Spending Accounts have actually been helpful in allowing people keep the cost of their health care down when dealing with out-of-pocket expenses, as Human Events explained recently.

A Flexible Spending Account allows workers to put aside money from their paycheck for health care expenses not covered by their health insurance. Because the money is pre-tax, whatever the amount of the contribution is deducted from the participant’s taxable income. Neither is it a taxable event when the participant withdraws the funds for an authorized medical expense.

The limit on contributions is a tax increase because it exposes more income to taxation, she said.

“You save anywhere from 25 cents to 40 cents on every dollar you use in the flexible account because of the tax protection,” Dietel said.

Thanks, Obamacare! In Obama’s world, keeping costs down actually means increasing costs and sneaky new taxation. Hey, remember when Obamacare “absolutely was not a tax?

More from Heartland:

Flex Spending Accounts and Health Savings Accounts: FSAs will now be capped in 2013 at $2500 (before they were limited only by employer). If you’re one of the thousands of people who have a special needs kid and had been using your FSA for their education payments, you’re out of luck. We already have the increased penalty for HSA withdrawal, so be aware of the other restrictions on your HSA, including no longer being able to purchase things over the counter without a prescription.

For the children? If by “for,” you mean harming.

If that wasn’t bad enough, Twitter users are reporting that their health care premiums are going up. You can totally “keep your plan,” so long as you can pay way more.

Like the devastating layoff bombs and hiring freezes, look for this to continue, sadly. Forward! 

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