Boehner’s fiscal cliff remarks taken out of context, astute conservatives set record straight

The conservative blogosphere was buzzing yesterday and this morning after reports of House Speaker John Boehner supposedly saying Republicans would work with the president to help the economy by raising tax rates. The backlash against Boehner appears to have stemmed from an article on CNBC’s website:

House Speaker John Boehner offered Wednesday to pursue a deal with a victorious President Barack Obama that will include higher taxes “under the right conditions” to help reduce the nation’s staggering debt and put its finances in order.

Many conservatives interpreted this to mean that Boehner was in favor of raising tax rates and quickly piled on him for caving to Democrats:

The day after Obama’s spend, spend, spend, and tax, tax, tax, policies garnered him a second term in the White House, House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) offered the president a way to save the economy which included raising taxes “under the right conditions.”

With all due respect to Speaker Boehner, when in the hell are the right conditions to raise taxes?

Our economy is not simply on its last leg but its last knee. We are down, and headed toward down and out if the president continues along the path he’s been on for four years. How in the world can taking even more money out of the America peoples’ paychecks help this situation?

But in the rush to judgment, they overlooked Boehner’s actual remarks, which called for higher tax revenues, not higher tax rates. Blogger RB was among the most vocal conservatives who attempted to set the record straight:

Let’s go to the videotape:

Among Boehner’s remarks:

And we certainly won’t solve [the problem of our fiscal imbalance] by simply raising tax rates or taking a plunge off the fiscal cliff.

Republicans have signaled a willingness to accept new revenue if it comes from growth and reform.

This is why going over part of the fiscal cliff and raising taxes on job creators is no solution at all.

Big Government has issued a correction.

In case further clarification was needed, these tweets were sent out from John Boehner’s Twitter account today:

It certainly doesn’t sound like he’s advocating higher tax rates.

RB is exactly right. Now, more than ever, conservatives need to stay on-message and on-point.

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Update:

Twitchy CEO Michelle Malkin reiterated the difference between tax rate increases and revenue increases this morning on “FOX & Friends”:

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